Stupid wax moth

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by danl, Jun 15, 2015.

  1. danl

    danl New Member

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    Lost a weak hive i have been nursing along to wax moth. Requeened 3 weeks ago after finding them queenless and weak with a laying worker. Steaped new queen for 9 days and released her. Checked yesterday to find about 100 bees and all frames crawling with wax worms. I took it as a total loss and took the whole thing home and put it in the deep freezer. Did I miss something? Is there something else I could of done?
     
  2. ibeelearning

    ibeelearning Member

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    I am sorry. I lost hives to WM years 2 & 3 in NE AL. I received lots of opinions-- some good, some not, but no answers. The reality is none of us was there to look, so none of us will know.

    In retrospect, I knew things were not right, population was dropping and bees weren't flying. But I didn't know enough to know how to intervene.

    I blamed the heat, or my looking in 1x day on them and fretting, or nasty 2nd hand wooden ware... but who knows? My learning forward is limited to keeping stronger hives that can police themselves.

    My guess for yours would be a hive weakened by vmites, robbing, or other pests. A faster queen release might have made a difference, but not if the colony was degraded.

    The worst loss was being out of the season until the next spring. Are you going to look for a nuc, or going to give it a rest until next year?
     

  3. danl

    danl New Member

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    I have three more hives one nuc and two packages that are thriving
     
  4. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I found moving my hives to full sun helped greatly with wax moth and small hive beetle, and of course keeping them strong too. I merge (combine) rather than requeen the weak ones.
     
  5. ibeelearning

    ibeelearning Member

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    A teaching-- that I kindda resented at the time-- was that saying wax moths killed my colony was like saying maggots killed the horse. Something else, or a combination of something elses, killed them, and the max moth was just finishing them off. I had to get to the point of understanding that all these pests exist all the time and the bees have to be strong enough to keep them under control. Like life in general, it is about balance, not eradication.

    Since one of my suspected causes was sketchy wood ware, I toasted the boxes good with a torch before reusing, particularly the corners.
     
  6. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    well yes. only weak hives are lost to wax moths, but a part of keeping a hive strong is reducing attacking pests, and for that full sun and an entrance reducer are very helpful. And of course not letting mites or other health issues get too severe, addressing the problems caused by drought and dearth aka feeding, and keeping an eye on how her Ladyship is doing.