Summer split?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by crazy8days, Jul 4, 2013.

  1. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    I have a hive that has always had HUGE numbers of bees. It's my no.1 hive. 3-4 weeks ago I found swarm cells. what I did and probably not what I should was I made a nuc with the old queen. She is a prolific layer. I already have in 2 deeps and she is laying in both. Well, I left the old hive to make their own queen cause I wanted part of the same genetics as her. That didn't happen. Talking to my long distance mentor She said I need to re-queen. My question is with this hive still so large but, no brood left can I order 2 queens and make an equal split? Is there enough time in the year to get numbers up for them to make it through winter? There are plenty honey/pollen stores they will have. Or to be safe stick to one queen for this hive. They key here is survival.
     
  2. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    It takes about a month for a new queen to emerge, make mating flights, and start laying well, you might be jumping the gun a little in calling them queenless. I would say you have to decide what your priorities are. If you want the best honey yield, the leave the hive as one unit and re-queen ASAP with a bought queen. One strong hive will produce a lot more honey than 2 weaker ones. If you want to make increase, then split it into as many 5 frame nucs as desired with purchased queens, they will be to colony strength by fall. What I would do first is put a frame of eggs from your old queen back into the old hive and see if they will make queen cells on that. That way you are perpetuating your favorite genetics.
     

  3. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    I know this hive is queenless. Yes, I want the most honey production. I have a mated queen ordered. I also want more hives. I guess that's a decision I need to make. Just want to know if I decide on a equal split will the make it through the winter. Thsnks
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    It would be a regional thing, but up here I would have no problem splitting it. There are folks still buying nucs if they are available. We are close to the end of that, but a solid split (with queen added) should be fine.
     
  5. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    If i wanted the same genetics i would do like pistopete, if they don't make a queen cell you still have time to put a bred queen in. If trey make a queen cell? they will store honey while waiting for the new queen, because they don't have brood to care for, so they will have winter stores when the new queen emerges. There is always a chance of something happening to the new queen (birds ect?) and you may have to combine. JMO. Jack