supersedure cell???

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Gator_56, Mar 28, 2013.

  1. Gator_56

    Gator_56 New Member

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    I did a hive inspection today and found these guys hanging around... are they supersedure cells?

    2013-03-28_13-23-32_230.jpg
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Swarm cells!
    Hard to tell by the picture but it looks like a couple haven't yet hatched, and a couple look like they've been chewed through the sides.
    Did you see any eggs or larvae?
     

  3. Gator_56

    Gator_56 New Member

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    No, but to be honest, i wouldn't know what I was looking for anyway.

    Is it to late or can I stop them swarming?
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    By the look of those cells, I'd say they've already swarmed. :sad:
     
  5. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    what perry said....swarm cells.
    here is a great pdf on queen cell identification, go to post#1;
    "This is a link to a pdf file to help you identify what type of queen cell you have on your frames, color photographs, where they are located, why they are there, with descriptions, differences, and recommended course of action /non action, and other informative valuable information:
    "

    There are queen cells in my hive-what should i do?
     
  6. DLMKA

    DLMKA New Member

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    I'd go for a walk to see if you can find them....
     
  7. reidi_tim

    reidi_tim New Member

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    I missed that the first time around good read ty:smile:
     
  8. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    I would think they have already swarmed judging from the fact that 1 of the cells or more appear to have been chewed open by a already emerged queen.
    Barry
     
  9. Gator_56

    Gator_56 New Member

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    Yeah they did.... no queen! I wonder if it's to late to order a new queen? I would like to get a full Russian.
     
  10. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Bummer, when I saw them on the bottom of the frame vs. the middle somewhere, I remembered those are more likely swarm. I noticed your bees are nice and black. Is that the camera or are they really that black? I noticed I have a few that color in my feral hives.
     
  11. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    judging from the destroyed Queens cells I would think you have the Virgin Queen running around the inside the hive. If colony strength is good finding her could very difficult as she isn't a lot bigger then her workers and is probably typically a running nervous queen. If that is true any attempt it introduce another queen will fail until she is found. Either the young queen will fight, more probable the workers will kill any introduced queen.
    Barry
     
  12. Gator_56

    Gator_56 New Member

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    They are darker bees. The queen that just left me (come think of it this kind of like a divorce... she took half my stuff) was a Russian Hybrid.
     
  13. Gator_56

    Gator_56 New Member

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    How long should I wait before finding the new queen, killing her and introducing a new one?
     
  14. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    Personally I would wait a few weeks to a month let her get fat and sassy much easier to find. She will need about a week to 10 days to get well mated another week to really start laying. You may find you like what you see.
    Barry
     
  15. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Personally, I'm with Barry on this one. Now that you have a virgin running around in there, let her do her thing. If she mates successfully you will have saved 20 or 30 dollars and not lost a lot of time versus a mated queen.
     
  16. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    the other thing you need to remember about honeybees is that it is not magic is math. it will take at least a week for any new queen to start laying eggs prior to that 3 introductory days so that the parent colony doesn't kill her. so 10 days have gone by before the first egg is laid. it will be another 21 days before the first workers have hatched. now we're at 30 days for brand new workers not foragers. meanwhile your existing workforce is starting to die of and in some cases it could be quite substantial numbers. so you have to decide.
    Barry
     
  17. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    What Barry says is definitely correct -- BUT, remember that, while your hive isn't raising brood, (waiting for the new queen to come into laying), since they have a queen, they will be very industrious and work hard collecting honey. If there is a honey flow going on, you could get a reasonable honey crop from the hive while it isn't using its resources replenishing its work force (=raising brood).
     
  18. Gator_56

    Gator_56 New Member

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    Now I'm confused(not that this anything new with me and beekeeping) and concerned.... I can back from taking my son to school this AM and found good many of my bees bearding on the outside. If this were August I wouldn't think much of it but even here in Florida it was in the 60's this morning. Any thoughts on why they would be doing this and should be concerned?

    2013-04-05_08-09-52_958.jpg
     
  19. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Could be they are crowded and you haven't expanded the hive according to their needs. They might also be in need of more ventillation.
     
  20. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    well down here in Florida things to get off start I don't know if you're working double brood chambers or not but if you have not you should to avoid brood chamber congestion which actually contribute quite a bit to swarming issues.
    Barry