Support pins

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Chickm1, Jun 4, 2010.

  1. Chickm1

    Chickm1 New Member

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    I'm putting all these news frames together, and putting foundation and support pins in them. One manufacturer has the holes in the side bars really clean, and the pins slide right in with thumb pressure only. The other manufacturer, the holes are very rough, and you literally have to drive the support pins in with a hammer. The pins are almost $50 a pound. Actually, there is suppose to be 1000 pins, in a little bag, for this much, and it can't be more than a pound and a half. The question occurs to me, "Why not just use nails in these holes? Once the comb is built around them, they will be secure, and they will extend a whole lot further into the foundation, than the little pins." Honey has little water in it, so there should not be much rust, and I did not really want to use galvanized. Have any of you tried this? I sure don't want to take all the time necessary to stretch wire across these things. I have never experienced blow outs in the extractor, but I have never used a radial, which I am now considering. I can see how the comb might blow out of frame, when spun on a radial.
     
  2. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I have use the larger nail used for frames as support pens. sometime a bit of wax is useful to make them fit a bit tighter.

    when I have extract these frames (typically I use these for chunk or comb honey) I place 4 rubber bands on each frame and I have very limit blow out in a radial extractor.
     

  3. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    I've not used them, but i have heard of beekeepers using bobby pins for support pins. Jack
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    >>>>Once the comb is built around them, they will be secure, <<<<

    Once the comb is drawn, you don't need the pins. They are only for holding it in place until it is drawn. They do not help with the blowouts.

    I can wire a frame in the time you can install the pins. After some practice, you can, too. The wire helps by securing it until it is drawn out, plus helping prevent the blowouts.

    Blowouts are normally associated with transcential extractors much more than radials. Radials empty both sides at the same time.
     
  5. Chickm1

    Chickm1 New Member

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    If all it is for is to hole it in place until they draw the wax out, I don't need them at all. On the Kelly frames, the support pins are a breeze, but on the Dadant frames, you have to use a hammer to drive them in. If you are dependent on the wire holding the wax centrered, until it is drawn out, wouldn't you have to put one on each side of the wax? When I kept bees years ago, I judt used the wired foundation and a centrifugal 4 frame extractor, and I never had the first foundation thrown from the frame.
     
  6. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    When wiring, I embed the wire in the wax, so it doesn't matter which side you put it on. It ends up in the middle. You can extract a foundationless frame if you turn it slow enough, or you can blow out a double wired frame if you turn fast enough. The wired combs take a little more abuse than the non-wired, making the extracting a little easier and faster.
     
  7. rast

    rast New Member

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    I'd give away the bag of pins I have left. If there is not a flow going they will chew the wax away from the pins.