Swarm arrived in my yard

Discussion in 'Swarms, Cut outs, and Trap outs' started by RE Jones, Mar 4, 2013.

  1. RE Jones

    RE Jones New Member

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    Sorry that I did not get any pictures of the trap out that I am currently doing. I'm running over there tomorrow and the camera is in the truck.

    While I was at my bee hives this afternoon, they were a lot of orientation flights going on and I was watching. The bees seem to be roaring as they were taking these flights, until I realized that there was a swarm landing in a tree right over my hives. I went to the truck and got my swarm removal bucket and in about ten minutes, it was all over. I got the queen on the first bucket and the rest came into the nuc that I had ready.
    they were about the size of a football. bees 03-04-13 003.jpg bees 03-04-13 004.jpg bees 03-04-13 005.jpg
     
  2. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    So the new season has started :grin:
    Three cheers 1. For spotting them.
    2. For being ready with a nuc on the spot.
    3. For catching the swarm "lock stock and barrel".
    :yahoo:
    And one more cheer for having the camera with you and sharing the experience with us.
    :clap:
     

  3. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Good catch!!

    Swarms are the best!!
     
  4. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    I had planned on having a swarm capture kit to keep in the truck. I guess I'd better get it together. It won't be long until swarm time around here.

    I'm glad your capture went ok. :)
     
  5. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Did you deturmin whether the swarm came from one of your hives? If so which one, and how many more hives are on the verge of swarming or have swarmed and are lost? But there is no denying the excitement of finding and hiving a swarm.
     
  6. Lburou

    Lburou Member

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    Yes, and its contagious! :)
     
  7. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I'm jealous. :mrgreen: :thumbsup:
     
  8. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    While working in my back yard, setting foundation sheets in frames, a few snoopy bees came around to examine the supers they were resting in. Did they just want a sniff of foundation or were they scouts looking for a suitable new home for a planned swarm. If they are of the latter, I hope they hold of till I can get extra supers ready. For the present, I'm preparing supers for hives that will need them soon.
     
  9. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    You won't believe it----the TV news just finished a long report about large swarms and plans to spray them and eliminate them while they rest on the ground overnight. Planes are following their flight path so they'll know exactly where to spray. :aikido: :eek:

    Okay, now relax, the swarms are enormous clouds of LOCUSTS, that have worked their way here, with the help of the wind currents, from southern Sudan, through Egypt and into the central Negev (not far from BeerSheba). The last time locusts came to Israel was around 2004, and then, only in insignificant numbers (I remember spotting a few in my garden). Tomorrow the wind is expected to change its direction and push whatever remains of them back south .
     
  10. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    I was just thinking about my younger days when I owned a night club and I thought the best thing in the world was free beer. :drinks: Well, I've swapped the 'r' for an 's' and the best thing in the world is free bees! I figure a swarm with a queen is worth $90 to $100, so that's a good thing. :thumbsup:
     
  11. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    Here is some info and a picture.
     
  12. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I saw that in the news yesterday. :shock: Freaky! :???:
     
  13. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    could have a potential travel of 280 miles in a day Won't take them long to find the next crop to feed on I would assume they would kill a honey flow creating great stress on a colony. I hope they miss you efmesch
     
  14. Ray

    Ray Member

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    Me too! Dirty rotten rassa fratten winter!

    I am talking about catching a swarm of honeybees not locusts!
     
  15. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    "Things always seem bleakest at the moment of occurrence, but at least we ain't got locusts." - Nick Yemana (Barney Miller)
     
  16. RE Jones

    RE Jones New Member

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    Keith, the swarm did not come from my hives, they came flying in from the north of me. I had just checked them a couple of days ago and none of them have any swarm cells in them. I only found one supercedure cell and I put it in the hive that I am doing the trap out with.

    The ladies are packing the bottom deeps with honey right now as the queens are up in the first super laying as of my inspection. No I do not run excluders and probably never will. They will reverse the hives later this month or at least that is what they did last year, fingers crossed!
    Robert
     
  17. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    This morning's paper reports that the locusts were successfully eliminated before they could do any real damage. But there are more swarms still in Egypt that have potential to arrive. Here's hoping that they don't.
     
  18. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    You may have a feral hive close by maybe from a swarm in previous years. They tend not to travel to far from the original hives. And away from competition from other hives.
    Use caution when taking supersede cells away from a colony the bees sense that something is not right and so they want a new queen. The bees sense that for their survival the queen need to be replaced and interfering with that could be detrimental for the colony's build up and survival.