Swarm Box ---- Plans or pics wanted

Discussion in 'Building plans, blueprints, and finished projects' started by Barbarian, May 24, 2013.

  1. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    I feel the urge to make a multi-functional swarm box. Has anyone got plans or pics ? I have looked on the Dave Cushman site (dave-cushman.net) but I was looking for a box with a detachable base.
     
  2. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    What do you mean by multi-functional? I use a standard 10 frame deep Langstroth with the bottom board attached with hive staples. I used it last night to capture a swarm off a tree branch. In the morning I will just transfer the frames to their permanent home.
    Were you also looking at using it as a swarm trap?
     

  3. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    Swarm (Collection) Box

    I do not want a bait hive or swarm trap.

    The boxes I have briefly seen are used when you go out to collect a swarm and are then used to transport the swarm home. Features of the box are :-

    1. A removable bottom (for when you wish the swarm to move up into the box) which is easily removed and then easily replaced giving a bee-proof seal

    2. Removable solid inner/top cover (for when putting box under a swarm) with screws/wing-nuts to get easy bee-proof seal.

    3. Mesh covered windows in the sides which are used when transporting to prevent swarm overheating/suffocating. Wooden(?) blanks to cover the windows when box is left out at collection site or home apiary. Hinge or turn buckle fittings.

    4. Closeable entrance in one end.

    5. Lightweight.

    6. Carrying handles or cleats --- I don't want to drop a box with a heavy swarm.

    7. Any other features that might be useful. :grin:

    Don't want much --- do I. :lol:
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    WOW! And I have just kept an empty hive and an empty nuc on my truck during swarm season for many years. I put the swarm in and take it to the apiary, set it down, and go get another hive or nuc to go on the truck. No transfer, no hassle. Am I doing it all wrong? :shock:
     
  5. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    It is part of our tradition to make new "improved" bits of beekeeping equipment. There are umpteen different hives, Snelgrove and Horsley boards, different floors and drainpipe bee vac extensions. The list goes on and on.

    Perhaps it's the climate or the inbreeding. :lol:

    I'm rather busy at the moment modifying the castle trebuchet. Will look out for further posts.
     
  6. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    How about an air conditioner for the hot weather and a heater for the winter swarms. :rolling:
    Then what about a shower for those swarms that arrive on dusty days or come from colonies with infectious diseases? :rotfl:
    What would you think of a one-way door to keep the bees from absconding once they've entered? :lol:
    Or a built-in MP3 that plays Mozart to keep the bees calm and relaxed?
    Sounds to me like you want something to put on the display shelf. When the time comes to grab a swarm box, the simpler the better.
     
  7. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I use a 5 gallon bucket duct taped to a pvc pipe, and dump that into a Lang medium or whatever I have handy.
     
  8. tmrschessie

    tmrschessie New Member

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  9. The Bee Guy

    The Bee Guy New Member

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    I use to build my Nucs with a removable bottom but why?
    I just remove the frames and place them in another hive body.
     
  10. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    I took this picture last week of a swarm box a keep around here makes. It was given to the keep that started me in keeping and is what he brought a swarm to me in. I don't know about "light weight," but, it's a good design. The bottom, the cleat, slides out to combine the hive or in my case, removed for a shake into my tbh. Under the the telescoping lid is a 1-1/2" to 2" tall frame/super with #8 mesh covering it. And, the board with wing nuts there at the entrance keeps the bottom board slide secure along with #8 mesh on that slit you see (for air I venting I suppose). Air vents on the stop sides with corks. I could see myself making some design changes but thought you would like to see this the sake of invention or ideas.

    mms_picture (69).jpg
     
  11. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    Thank you for the information and the photo.

    I like the idea of the sliding floor. It should make closing the box after capturing a swarm easier than a separate floor. I will have to think how to make a secure bee-proof floor fastening.

    How many frames does it hold ? What changes would you make to the design ?
     
  12. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Welcome. The box held 10 frames. The wood board with the wing nuts there int he front secure the sliding floor rather well. I would like a sliding lid too. Because, I leave the lid slightly ajar for the bees to march in more efficiently. Plus, a sliding lid would eliminate having to strap down the telescoping lid.
     
  13. The Bee Guy

    The Bee Guy New Member

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    Here is a 6 frame Nuc or Hive I use.
    It makes a good sized swarm trap too. 6frame2.jpg 6frame1.jpg 6frame3.jpg
     
  14. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I just watched an interesting show all about that on the History Channel. :thumbsup:
     
  15. ORoedel

    ORoedel New Member

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    It´s not what your looking for, but for me it´s the best, light and practic! I made it of painel wood, it fits in one in another, and some frame. It´s have three entrances, 2 are equiped with "cleareboard" pieces and one is open (which I close after the queen and most of the bees are in the box). Under the 5 frames is a lot of space for the bees. In the top are holes for ventilation. aIMG_1529.jpg aIMG_1530.jpg aIMG_1531.jpg aIMG_1532.jpg IMG_1533a.jpg
     
  16. Daniel Y

    Daniel Y New Member

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    I screw a piece of plywood to the bottom of a ten frame or 5 frame box. take the frames to fill that box along with me and shake the bees into the box or a bucket. You can't always get the box up to the bees. Once I think I hve the queen in teh box I place another piece of plywood over the top leaving a gap as an entrance. In the evening I return screw down the top piece of plywood and transport. I have never had issues with a long drive or risk of overheating. When I get them to my yard there is no waiting until morning the box is tipped on its side. the bottom piece of plywood removed and the box is set on a bottom board. This does get some bees stirred up but hopefully they have moved to the frames by this time. Open the entrance place the plywood bottom on the ground at the entrance and leave it over night. Next morning they get the top removed an inner cover added and I start feeding them.
    I have not seen a heavy swarm yet.
     
  17. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    The swarms I caught this year have been less than 2 ft. off the ground. I just take a 10 frame hive over. Remove the middle 4 frames and shake the bees. Once all are in I ducktape the inner cover opening and use a twisted up paper towel to close the entrance. Paper towel IMO is easy to pull out than other things I tried. Ratchet strap and off I go!