Swarm Cell!!!???

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by melrose, Jul 24, 2012.

  1. melrose

    melrose New Member

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    The wife and I were checking our hives, looking to pull a frame of eggs out for a trap-out that we have inprog.
    During our investigation, while inspecting a 2-brood/1-super hive we noticed a queen cell on the bottom of the top brood box center/right frame (I have 8-frame boxes). Funny thing is that the top brood box they've used for honey, prob less than a dozen capped brood up there.
    We also found others but they were opened. Odd thing to me is that this hive is FAR from crowded.
    We took the frame out and gave it to the box of bees that we took off the trap-out, hopefully they'll take up with the queen,

    .... does anyone think that they'll tend to swarm considering the location?

    Another thing, when found, could a swarm cell effectively be removed, pushed into a frame in a supercedure nature and the bees would take to her?

    thanks
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Is there still eggs in the hive? If so, I would say supercedure cell. With others being open, I would think you got it out just before it would be killed. Yes, a queenless hive will accept a queen cell and let her emerge, mate, and take over the hive.
     

  3. melrose

    melrose New Member

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    I've read that supercedure cells are typically located center to top of the frame. This cell was located on the bottom as well as the others. The colony still looks to be growing and still high in number, don't seem to have swarmed. ??
    Nonetheless, good to hear that the bees from the trapout will accept her.
    Problem is, as with other parts of the US, heat/drought has slowed comb building. All the frames pulled from the trap-out are full of capped/uncapped honey. When I add another box of frames should they be stacked on top or placed under the box of honey frames, (which would stimulate better comb building)

    thnx again for the help
     
  4. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    I guess keep an eye on that hive and make sure they have eggs in case you removed their only hope of making queen withthat queen cell.
     
  5. melrose

    melrose New Member

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    BTW, Ididn't answer Iddee, we did see some capped cells, appeared to be drone in the top box intermingled with the honey. These frames were drawn when we put them in with the trapped bees.
     
  6. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    ""I've read that supercedure cells are typically located center to top of the frame."" :thumbsup:

    Again, did you see EGGs in the hive?
     
  7. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

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    When my hive superceded a couple of months ago, the cell was on the bottom.

    IMAG0127.jpg
     
  8. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Typically is the operative word folks. Swarm cells are typically located along the bottom of frames (in larger numbers), supercedure/emergency cells are typically located on the "face" of combs (in fewer numbers). However, think about it, if the bees need to raise a queen in an emergency and the only viable eggs/larvae the correct age happen to be located along the bottom of a frame........? The rest of the hive should tell the story as to what is going on in relation to queen cell location.
     
  9. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    as Iddee and Perry have suggested not one single clue will lead you to the proper answer (and yes the girls will intentionally confuse you from time to time) when it comes to discovering why a hive is making plans for a new queen.

    no matter where queen cells are formed (and lots are made that never hatch) other indicators like crowding and extent of egg laying and even number of cells should be taken into consideration when you are trying to determine 'why' they are making a new queen.
     
  10. melrose

    melrose New Member

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    :dontknow: hmmmm