Swarm moved into my hive too

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Mainah, Aug 9, 2018.

  1. Mainah

    Mainah New Member

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    this one was a monster and moved into a ten frame deep on Tuesday morning. 9 am I looked out and saw an SUV sized golden cloud over my stack of deeps just starting to beard on the top corner. The weather here has been gorgeous hot 90's and goldenrod just coming on...I think they need more room but all I have is more 10 deeps and of course the one they picked is on top of the other two (outside access only for the bees for the most part they are ignoring the lower two). I'll have to swap the boxes and remove the divider

    Also I have read that I should give them at least a week before I go poking around to see what's what. I am hoping I had at least one frame of foundation in there with the drawn comb....also I have an in frame feeder I want to give them but figure I will have to put a second deep on to accomodate that-should I put in 8 drawn frames with the feeder over the one they are in-is it too late? Can't wait to see what they look like but the front it is a traffic jam at the small entrances and lots of airborne bees waiting to get in. My gut tells me the hive is pretty full.

    I guess I just don't want to wait that week to try and give them more room, but it involves shifting their box down one and I don't want to rattle them so soon. Advice?
     
  2. Mainah

    Mainah New Member

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    After I posted this I went out well after dark because the night before I had about a handful outside the entrance. It was much cooler last night-60's? and only a guard bee or two in the hole. I pressed my head against the side and heard a very small hum and it didn't sound like much!

    When I was observing yesterday-from a safe distance because it was bedlam- it seemed there was a stream coming out but then I thought it was balanced coming and going. It's an old double nuc with probably 3/4 entrance holes. I had 4 open and was worried I needed a bigger entrance.

    This morning, again, much cooler, I started worrying part of the original swarm was going back to the home hive now that a new queen is most likely established there-would they do that? (the bees came to me-maybe a good reason to box up a swarm and move it right away?)

    SO this morning I blocked off all but two of the small entrances, thinking they may need to be better able to defend if they lost their majority? I could walk up there right now (2 pm) in shorts and tank top with probably no smoker and open it up-but I wouldn't get within 8 feet of it yesterday. At this point I am thinking of putting the feeder right in the one deep and seeing what's what-probably the worn out Queen with a handful of loyals. UGH!



    But here's a thought-maybe the bees leave with the old queen hedging their bets on the emerging ones... certainly the bees in general would be better off if the new queen can retrieve the bulk of the workers to stock her up for the winter.
     

  3. Mainah

    Mainah New Member

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    I guess this is a one person thread. If anyone's reading and hasn't figured out what happened, I'll tell you. Armed with bee coat, stiff gloves (from disuse) smoker (I can never keep one going!) khaki pants-and it's hot today! 2 pints of syrup, a clean in hive gallon feeder, and no coherent plan I lightly smoked the few pitiful bees, pulled the covers, exposed part of the hive top, starting pulling frames, pulled two empties of drawn comb to make room for the feeder and pulled back two more frames to get to the bees.

    Starting looking for a queen and saw a big fat queen cell smack in the middle of frame #5 (covered with bees the whole frame-and perhaps a smaller one near the bottom. I didnt' want to poke too much, so I didn't check the last few frames, but I am guessing the queen arrived with the swarm, laid a few eggs, and they swarmed again. The remaining bees made a queen cell. Seems like they must have started building it out when they arrived because it's only been three days. Sigh- a breeding nuc in Maine in the middle of August. Gave them the feeder and closed it back up for now, but not looking good. :( especially with zero stores.
     
  4. mark nic

    mark nic New Member

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    start feeding and see what happens
     
  5. Sour Kraut

    Sour Kraut Member

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    It never fails..by the time you realize they need lots more room, its too late.

    Swarms will leave an otherwise 'ideal' location if ventilation is bad or if it is too small for the size of the swarm.

    Not to sound 'preachy', but you should have gone in immediately, re-stacked the boxes 2 or three high over a full entrance.
     
  6. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    well sorry about the one person thread thing, I got 4 inches of rain Friday and Saturday and was keeping ponds from running over and my bees dry, and keeping an eye on the leak in my brand new roof. Yes if the swarm is really large, while they are settling and in daylight, get the queen excluder out and be sure they have adequate room and I don't give more than one frame of drawn comb unless that swarm is from my hive. I want them to build comb and get rid of any viruses they may be carrying in the process so I feed a lot of sugar water to get them on it.
     
    Bbuck likes this.