Swarm trap questions

Discussion in 'Swarms, Cut outs, and Trap outs' started by AcmeBees, Mar 9, 2012.

  1. AcmeBees

    AcmeBees New Member

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    I find the idea of catching a swarm and the possibility of getting a "free" colony fascinating and also economical (read cheap, which I am).

    Since I'm new, I do not have a ton of extra equipment to set up swarm traps. Plus I do not have any drawn comb or old comb for attractants.

    Question #1 Should I simply set up an empty single hive body set up in my yard with some lemongrass scent in it?

    Question #2 If I set up a trap less than two miles from my bee yard, and God willing catch a swarm, can I move that swarm to the bee yard or would I have to take them elsewhere for a few weeks before bringing them the my bee yard?

    Thanks in advance for any suggestions and input.

    Also, I'd like to add that this forum is a breath of fresh air when it comes to internet forums. The hobby or special interest forums that I have experienced have the most cynical, sarcastic, hurtful jack wagons responding and snarking about this and that. I have found none of that here.........Thank You.
     
  2. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Sure you can set up empty hive bodies with a little lemongrass oil in them, bees are funny and will build in many many things, a clean space that provides shelter from wind, rain, and predators is a plus.
    Placing hives up off of the ground is a plus.
    Old comb is a plus.
    Being in an area that has bees is a plus.

    As far as not having enough equipment, have you seen the five frame nucs made out of 1/2" plywood? One 4 x 8 sheet will make four of them. If you have a saw and some free time you can whip out a dozen or two in a day. Great project for you and the kids and/or wife.
     

  3. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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  4. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    Ditto on everything G3 said.:thumbsup: ... Shift+R improves the quality of this image. CTRL+F5 reloads the whole page.
     
  5. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp New Member

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    AcmeBees, you've found a good forum here. I'm a newbee, too, and they've been a great bunch of folks to me. Ton of information here and very helpful advice...comic relief, too!!! ;)

    As for boxes to catch hives in....wood is great but you could even go as far as using cardboard boxes that copy paper came in or some similar box. I'm pretty sure I saw a youtube video of a guy making a trap from such a box...simple. Really, it only needs to last a season...if you wanted to you could waterproof it with a little latex paint or something. You could put several together for "cheap". ;)

    Those wood nucs that G3 mentioned are nice, though...and would last for years! Just be sure to kind of "camouflage" the traps when you put them out so the two-legged varmits won't be able to easily spot them and mess with them.

    LGO is highly recommended by most everyone. Besides LGO, I"m going to have some foundation in my traps. Wax moths won't mess with it (from what I understand) but it still has a nice, waxy, beeie smell to it. It may not make a difference worth a hill of beans but if it catches a swarm I'll swear it was the foundation! :lol: I'm putting some frames in my traps with starter strips in them along with some full depth pieces of foundation in the center of the center frames to act as a "ladder" for the bees to climb up. We'll see....

    Question #1... I'd go ahead and put a trap up in your yard, certainly won't hurt anything and scouts will be cruising around everywhere looking for a cavity. Plus, it's your property so it's "safe". ;)

    Question #2... I say with much confidence...I don't know. :grin: I *think* if you catch them within a day or two after they've gone into the hive that you will be "ok"....if they stay there long enough to get firmly established you might have a problem.

    Best wishes!
    Ed
     
  6. Bsweet

    Bsweet Member

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    Swarm trapping is like fishing, you never know until you give it a try. You can set a trap right next to a bee yard and catch nothing or set one in the middle of town and not be able to keep the trap empty. But if/when you catch one reset a trap in the same spot as sometimes a hive will swarm more than once(after swarms). Jim
     
  7. jb63

    jb63 New Member

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    [​IMG] This one I made out of plywood, and it holds 7 deep frames.It's nice to have some drawn comb but if you don't have any it's ok.The idea of putting frames in is so you can leave it alone for a while and let the queen start laying.As for the jack-wagons and snarks, there in no room for that here.I also enjoy this forum,and it's sence of humor.:smile:
     
  8. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    If you want to move a hive, move it any night after the bees are inside. The most you "Might" loose is the oldest foragers, who would die within a few days anyway. Not worth worrying about.
     
  9. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Great forum, great advice. I've got
    Scout bees checking out 3 traps here
    Today.
    Gypsi
     
  10. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp New Member

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    Go git'em, Gypsi! ;)

    Ed
     
  11. AcmeBees

    AcmeBees New Member

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    Well, I guess I'm in the swarm fishin' business.

    2 sheets of 1/2" plywood, some Titebond II, 1/2 case beer, some plans from the internet, mix in some 18ga brad nailin'.................priceless!!

    P3040002.jpg

    Many, many thanks to G3, Iddee, and all that act as thread librarians to guide us newbies.
     
  12. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    You are very welcome for any info we can hook you up with......................the charge will be a ride in that little airplane!
     
  13. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Intheswamp wrote: "it still has a nice, waxy, beeie smell to it".

    I just about spewed my coffee on the computor when I read that description. :shock: :lol: :rolling::rotfl:

    Beeie? Beeie? intheswamp, you kill me sometimes!
     
  14. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    My technique with swarms has been to move them the first night they move in. No matter how close or far you move them that first night, the next day they are going to set their compass on the new site. If you leave them where they settled even for one day, that spot will be where they home into and if you move the hive a short distance a few days later, you might lose a large percentage of your swarm. They'll be looking for their hive where they first settled in. If you plan on moving the caught swarm for a long distance (over 5 miles), than there's no reason to rush the move since they'll have to re-set their homing sights in the new place.
     
  15. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp New Member

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    Ok...so a "y" would've worked better? :grin:
     
  16. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp New Member

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    Thanks for posting this EF. I had been wondering about the window of opportunity regarding that. So they orient within a day of taking up residence? I've got a couple of smaller traps set out close to the house that I've been checking each day...been checking in the mornings but probably need to change that to evening if I can work it out. I wonder if the bees were to be shut up for a day or so (temperature permitting) if they would reorient once they're opened back up and at the new location?

    Ed
     
  17. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Ed asks: " I wonder if the bees were to be shut up for a day or so (temperature permitting) if they would reorient once they're opened back up and at the new location?"

    I wouldn't recommend trying that--remember, swarms are on a short supply of food and every day of foraging is vitally important to their very existance.
     
  18. Indiana Dave

    Indiana Dave New Member

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    :thumbsup:This is EXACTLY why this is the BEST forum on the internet!!! Great people who aren't afraid to share great info, and good humor!
     
  19. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    That's a fine bunch of swarm traps Acme! I painted mine so I might get more than a year out of them.

    Gypsi
     
  20. AcmeBees

    AcmeBees New Member

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    yep, I've painted them, and had some aluminum trim sheet left over from past projects. I am making the lids wrapped in aluminum to makem' last.