Tampa Bay honey flows for late June? Dearth? Feed?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by CarrollwoodBees, Jun 30, 2012.

  1. CarrollwoodBees

    CarrollwoodBees New Member

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    Florida honey flows for late June/early July for Tampa Bay?

    I've been feeding 2/1 syrup off and on for my two new hives. They are not pulling out much wax, although they are flying and in general doing fine. Does this mean the drought diminished the nectar and they are hungry? There is open honey in the hive, but not frames and frames. More like 3 or 4 very partial frames. Does this mean I feed continuously now that we are going into full on summer dearth?
     
  2. RE Jones

    RE Jones New Member

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    I live about 20 miles to the east of you. I have not fed my bees this year at all. They are still bringing in pollen and must be bringing in nectar, as I went in to them today and two more frames of honey have been added to one hive.

    I will not feed until they have used up their stores, if they do.

    As long as I see them bringing in pollen and the supers keep being added too, i will not feed.

    Are they bringing in pollen? How long have you had the hives? Were they started from nucs or packages?

    Are the hives in a rural area or city?

    Robert
     

  3. crackerbee

    crackerbee New Member

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    I'm only10 miles North of R.E. Jones,and like you CarrollwoodBees I'm having to feed 8 of 9 hives,and have been for almost 2 weeks.Just goes to show that it all depends where you live.And you may have to feed until Sept. when things start blooming again.Right now I'm going thru 50 lbs. of sugar a week and that's mixing 1:1 syrup.

    Also welcome to the forum.:hi::wave:
     
  4. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    both my out yards are not doing all that well, some pollen coming in a little nectar but all in all Ill end of feeding them soon, my yard at the house is just the opposite, just added a 4th nine to cone-o-bees and the other 2 hives are 4 nines high, even the 1 removal from the trailer thats in a nuc is building up stores, funny how 15-20 miles can make that much of a difference.
     
  5. CarrollwoodBees

    CarrollwoodBees New Member

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    They are bringing in pollen and a modest amount of nectar. To answer REJones questions: I've had trouble with the hives. One is an oldie that swarmed and requeened itself. Didn't know if it was going to succeed or not, but it seems she's laying okay, not great. Won't know if she's africanized until the hive gets stronger, but if so, it'll mean requeening, which I never have luck with (which is why I let the swarmed hive requeen itself). So far, they are nice.

    The other was a medium-frame nuc I bought a month ago and it's busy and also bringing in modest amounts of nectar. This one is much happier. Both have at least 7 or 8 frames filled with something, so I feel I need to super just in case. But neither hive seems to want to draw out wax even when I take a couple of honey frames from below and swap them out to the top box.

    So, I guess I'm feeding? 20 miles is a fer piece, REJones, especially in Tampa. It's the difference between urban and rural, almost, so I'm thinking you have better forage. Do you have cabbage palm? Saw palmetto?
     
  6. RE Jones

    RE Jones New Member

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    We have cabbage palm out here but not much palmetto.

    Where I live we have sub-divisions all around, not on my street. I think that they can find different sources all around me.

    If I were you, I would put the supers on and see what happens. I had one hive in an 8 frame deep and it took them about 2-3 weeks before they started drawing comb in the super, but when they did, they went nuts.
    Robert
     
  7. crackerbee

    crackerbee New Member

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    CarrollwoodBees what type of foundation are you using?

    I had trouble using the Pierco foundation last year like the kind Gary(Americasbeekeeper) had over at U.S.F. Botanical,I posted a thread about it here on the forum and one member suggested I try coating the foundation with additional beeswax using a small paint roller,and after that the bees quickly drew out all the coated frames in a couple of weeks.
     
  8. CarrollwoodBees

    CarrollwoodBees New Member

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    I'm using wax foundation. I won't go in again for a couple of weeks since I swapped some frames from lower to upper. I'm also going to feed since I don't intend to harvest any honey this year. With the drought, they just didn't build up enough for me to think I'll get fall honey with enough left to last through winter. (I prefer not to feed.)

    If they don't move up, I'll try coating some frames with old wax. Thanks for the tip.
     
  9. crackerbee

    crackerbee New Member

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    If you're already using wax foundation,it most likely won't help to coat them with additional wax,I'd try feeding 1:1 and see it that helps.

    I'm feeding 1:1 right now(and I loathe feeding as well),and all colonies are building up nicely and drawing frame well.It too bad there's not much out there around me for them,except cabbage palm and saw palmetto.
     
  10. CarrollwoodBees

    CarrollwoodBees New Member

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    OK, thanks for the help. It's nice to have corroboration.