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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a TBH that I had to build as the swarm that I got three weeks ago was out growing their small one that I had put them in. It was only a 12 bar hive that I planned on using as a nuc. I had to build a four footer as these ladies were working hard.
They are now on bar 10 in their new home and do not look like they are slowing down.
These are bars 4 and 5.
 

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Wow, they look beautiful! Lots of gorgeous capped brood and capped honey!
You should be proud. :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I am proud, but all I did was give the girls a home, they have done the rest.
I am afraid that when they all hatch, the four foot TBH is going to get small in a hurry.
Guess I need to start another one.
Robert
 

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RE Jones said:
Guess I need to start another one.
Robert
Well, why not?
When you think about all the many reasons that hives can be lost or fail these days, it always makes sense to have an extra hive around.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I do have another TBH with a small swarm that I am sure if they were anyone else's, they would have pinched the queen and combined hives.
I am new enough that I want to give them a chance to make it through the winter and see what happens.
I think I had a virgin queen in this swarm as it took almost 30 days before she started laying eggs. In fact at one time I thought I did not have a queen, but then I saw her.
I want to put the next swarm in a lang hive that I have set up and just see what the difference between them is.
I also have the TBH nuc that I made and that is the one that they were moved from.
My wife has already asked "How many is enough?", to which I replied, I'll let you know when I know.
Robert
 

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Robert:

You are already ahead of me, and I started last spring with 2 newly installed hives in 10 frame Langs.

I currently have 4, my original 2, and 2 that I inherited. I plan on ordering 2 more packages for next spring. I've been thinking about trying a TBH, but may wait another year. Northern climate and all.

Good luck.
 

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RE Jones said:
I do have another TBH with a small swarm that I am sure if they were anyone else's, they would have pinched the queen and combined hives.
I am new enough that I want to give them a chance to make it through the winter and see what happens.
Robert, though it's true that most of the time small colonies will likely not make it through a harsh winter, there was one woman in the bee club near me who had a dwindling colony of literally only about 2 cups' worth of bees and a queen left, last year in late Fall. Her bee mentor told her they didn't have much of a chance to survive. But survive they did, through a cold NY winter, and they became a large healthy hive this year. Everyone was really amazed. You never know!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
gunsmith, I'm not so sure it is the TBH that is the ticket, I think I just got a great bunch of bees in this swarm. I have been feeding and they are taking a quart a day, a bunch of them out foraging. They just seem to be a great hive.
I will be putting a wild hive that I got into a lang hive just to "see" the difference. As soon as the weather evens out and we have a good sunny day, I will be cutting and cropping this hive.
Omie, that is why I am hanging on to this small swarm, just to see what they do if they survivie. As I consider myself a hobbyist, I will not be losing anything but some time if they fall on their face. They have only built five small combs on five bars, queen has laid eggs on two of them and the rest have uncapped honey on them. It just goes to show that the bees do know how many of them they are and build according to the population. That is my opinion for what it is worth.
Robert
 

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some kinds of bee overwinter with extremely small cluster size. so size matter little in this regards. winters in Florida are generally not so severe or long that cluster size much matter in regards to survival. even here I have overwinter queens and bees in baby nuc boxes (the size of a child sized shoe box).

winter time here (I suspect in much of Florida also) does seem to reveal those queens that are inadequate fairly quickly. I suspect part of the equation is these queens don't have adequate pheromone levels and come the first cold snap the population of workers is gone.
 
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