Telescoping Roof

Discussion in 'Building plans, blueprints, and finished projects' started by Barbarian, Jan 2, 2013.

  1. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    I notice from the posts that several members are busy this Winter building new equipment. I have come across a problem with my telescoping roofs which may give the builders some thought.

    The top of a roof is usually covered by a sheet of metal. With time and wear small holes can develop. This produces a sodden (heavy) board under the metal cover. To cope with this, during builds or re-builds, I put a layer of bituminised shed roofing felt under the metal skin.

    Do any members use different techniques ? . :???:
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I haven't had any long enough to wear out yet. :???:
     

  3. Daniel Y

    Daniel Y New Member

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    how long have you been keeping bees that you wear holes through the metal?

    Here are my concerns with your fix. you will trap moisture between the metal and the protective layer. water likes to travel via capillary action. the entire under side of the metal will become soaking wet unless you give that water a way to drain away. You might wan to look at how moisture is controlled and shed under siding on houses as an example.

    I think your time and money might be better spent just recovering damaged lids though.
     
  4. Omie

    Omie Active Member

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    I would think incorporating a layer of insulation or weatherproofing of any kind right into the construction of the top cover could only be a good thing.
     
  5. Daniel Y

    Daniel Y New Member

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    Insulation in the lid might help with the warmer air of the hive and the cold surface of the cover issue. I suspect a hive gets warm during the day from the sun and when the sun set the outside air gets cold faster than the enterior of the ive. this is where you get the temperature difference that results in condensation. As the air in the hive cools off just more slowely this moisture then freezes. But you still have that period of time where warmer air contacts a colder surface. Insulating the top cover may help reduce that condensation effect. An absorbant material would do the same. it does not prevent the moisture from condensing it just prevents it from getting on the bees.
     
  6. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Is the metal used on your covers thin aluminum? Up until the 1990's you could pick up aluminum printing plates for free or at the most recycled aluminum prices with oxidization and rain washing the oxidation away I have seen holes appear in a few also. The Printing plates were thin to start with you could fold the edges over with your fingers. Non of the papers uses aluminum plates any more now they are miler or paper for small runs.
     
  7. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    I have some of the old printing plates Apis is talking about and it is easy to tear a small hole in it with the corner of another cover or brick. I jut smear some silicon caulk in the hole and go about my business. When making the tops I always paint all of the wood except the inside bottom of the plywood, then cover it with metal. I still have a few sheet of the printing plates left (from back in the late 60's), but have been using a thicker aluminum flashing from home depot or lowes.
     
  8. Minz

    Minz Member

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    Why Aluminum and not the Galvanized? Galvanized is half price (and did I mention that I am cheap)
     
  9. Ray

    Ray Member

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    I personally would shy away from galvanized anything. It is composed of Lead and Zinc and isn't supposed to leach but....
     
  10. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Much easier to bend the edges down and nail through. The price was not too bad, seems like a 50 foot roll was around $50, that would cover about 25 tops.
     
  11. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Used 30 gauge galvanized in 24" wide rolls came in 60' or 100' lengths ran the rolls through the slitter to cut to width, and cut to length with a cutter I made from veneer planer blade from a saw mill. Took one blade and cot it in half had to weld tabs on to the blade to drill pivot hole thru. Drill bits wouldn't even scratch the surface, Some of the hardest steel I have come across. Next to the break for 4 folds and done. Would use 7/16" crown by 5/8" long galvanized soffit staples to attach it to the cover.
    Sheer.jpg
     
  12. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    Metal ------ Galvanized does last longer but I prefer aluminium. It is lighter and easier to bend. Beware --- some aluminium sheet is similar to beer can material and tears easily........ "You pays your money and makes your choice."

    Insulation/Condensation -------- My roofs are of a design that has a ventilated air-space between the top of the inner cover and the underside of the roof.. ------ but that's another story.
     
  13. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    Ive been in the construction trades all my life, dont use galv metal go aluminium, even a small scratch in the top of a galv outer cover will rust fast.
     
  14. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Migratory covers are the only way for me, Switched over to them about year 4 of keeping bees and have never gone back. I have inherited many telescoping covers over the years, but the ability to push hives together for moving, and winter 4 pack warping of hives makes me prefer migratory. Have extras cause they work as super pallets with the clears on each end the super hand truck slips right under for easy super moving. stacks or supers can be stacked tight together for storage and another cover on top. a good coat of paint and no metal to worry about.
     
  15. Minz

    Minz Member

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    I spray paint my tops because I figured it would rust where I cut it. I build some telescoping tops without metal and they seemed to hold water on the tops. I also built about a dozen migratory tops this last fall and they need a couple of extra bricks to keep them from warping.
    I would not be concerned with leaching unless you were welding it (different story). I would say that it was used for most of the water pipes up to the late 1970’s, but same could be said for the lead pipes in the early 1900’s. LOL
     
  16. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    I've gone almost completely migratory tops, i use 3/4 in. waverboard and cover it with aluminium flashing, i also run a 2x2 CCA strip on each side (from end to end) to help keep them from warping. To me a inner cover is just another place for SHB to hide, and takes up guard and worker bee time. Jack