Tell me what this is

Discussion in 'Pests and Diseases' started by RE Jones, Oct 31, 2011.

  1. RE Jones

    RE Jones New Member

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    Sugar dusted my four foot TBH last Thursday and was not able to drop the bottom board until today. I had the board coated with petroleum jelly to trap anything that fell.
    This hive does not like the sugar dust treatment!! I had to back off four times as they covered my veil where I could not see.
    All I found was a bunch of pollen and these three worms, maggots or larvae. Can anyone tell me what they are?
    Thanks, Robert
     

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  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Look like wax moth to me.
     

  3. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I would go along with Iddee, I don't know what SHB larvae would look like so my guess would be wax moth.
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    SHB larva are smaller, and don't tend to be in small numbers. If there's one, there's usually a hundred.

    Wax moth, you can sometimes find a lone larva.
     
  5. RE Jones

    RE Jones New Member

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    Any treatment that I can do, or let the bees handle it?
    This hive is pretty crowded and they are defensive. Only one of the larvae was alive, the rest were dead.
    Thanks, Robert
     
  6. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    wax worm larva. if the hive is strong and packed there is not much more you can do, it is not unusual to find a stray larva or two in a hive where a wax moth sneaked in and got a few eggs laid before she was escorted out. If your hives were low on numbers that they could not cover comb (foundation does not count since the larva will not attack it to much of an extent) you can install an entrance reducer. Once you find SHB larva in a hive it is a down hill slide for the most part.
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a few is likely not much to worry about. with wax worms large numbers or trash being hauled out the front door is another matter. I would guess the three wax worms (the black one is approaching death) were dislodge from between box layers in that small and often uneven gap between top bar and bottom bars. active bees will seal them in there and any shuffling of frames or box layer will dislodge them.

    ps... my mistake you said you had a tbh.
     
  8. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    Wax moth and small hive beetle larva are the same size until the wax moth matures.
    "Comparison of beetle and wax moth larvae
    You can differentiate the hive beetle from wax moth
    larvae by examining their legs. Both species have
    three sets of legs just behind the head, but small hive
    beetle larvae lack the series of paired prolegs that run
    the length of the wax moth larva’s body." from
    http://pubs.cas.psu.edu/FreePubs/PDFs/AGRS116.pdf page 68, 69

    Figure 3 is a good large image of SHB larva
    http://www.cals.ncsu.edu/entomology/api ... 20copy.pdf
     
  9. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    Americanbeekeeper writes:
    Wax moth and small hive beetle larva are the same size until the wax moth matures.

    tecumseh:
    not exactly correct. there are various form of wax moth (the lesser and greater being two prime examples) each produces a larvae of different size. diet will also effect the size enough that often time the greater wax moth can be mistaken for the lesser wax moth.
     
  10. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    Size is relative to development. Not everything comes out full grown. There is a point where both, or all three, could be the same size.
     
  11. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I think you will find that a 3/8 in. long immature SHB larva is 1/2 the diameter of a 3/8 in. long immature wax moth larva. That, plus the difference in adult size, is why I say the wax moth larva is larger.
     
  12. RE Jones

    RE Jones New Member

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    Whatever it is, there are no more. I just opened the hive and checked and everything looks good. The bees have closed off one hole to a one bee only size and have the other one closed down to about half.
    I did find one SHB that met it's maker and that was all that I saw.
    The bees are covering the comb where the larvae were found on the bottom board, but I saw nothing out of the ordinary.
    I will keep checking when weather permits.
    Thanks, Robert
     
  13. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    you want bees that will take care of these problems themselves. if??? a hive has sufficient population when you do have serious wax worm or shb problems you will see debris being tossed out the front door. the wax worm works real fast and the shb a bit slower to totally overtake a hive.
     
  14. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    Please take a look at the pictures in the links I posted. American Bee Journal, August 2011, page 770, also has the comparison image filling the frame. The difference in diameter is minimal (and can be nonexistent based on nutrition)between wax moth and small hive beetle larva of the same length.
     
  15. RE Jones

    RE Jones New Member

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    I'm wondering if they did not take care of these themselves. I found them on the bottom board under a screen on this TBH. It is possible that the bees threw them down there??
    As I said in the first post, all of them were dead except for the one in the second picture and it was crawling when I found it.
    I thought the SHB laid the eggs in the comb. If that is the case, the bees may have removed them and dropped them down there??
    All of the wax moth larve that I have seen, were laid in the frames of the hive body of a lang hive. They were in a type of cocoon.
    I looked at the hive today and saw nothing out of the ordinary, so maybe the bees are taking care of it.
    Robert
     
  16. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    RE Jones writes:
    All of the wax moth larve that I have seen, were laid in the frames of the hive body of a lang hive. They were in a type of cocoon.

    tecumseh:
    technically I think you are speaking of the pupae stage of the wax moth. it is the larvae stage where they do the most damage.

    another RE Jones snip:
    I'm wondering if they did not take care of these themselves. I found them on the bottom board under a screen on this TBH. It is possible that the bees threw them down there??

    tecumseh:
    maybe yes and maybe no. sometime under any screen debris could accumulate and the wax moth larvae could have developed in the location below the screen.