Temperament changes when requeening a hive? a swarm?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Skyhigh, Sep 30, 2011.

  1. Skyhigh

    Skyhigh New Member

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    How long does it take for a hive to reflect the genetics of a new queen? In looking through past threads, someone mentioned a hive can change temperament in as quickly as "2 brood cycles". Does that mean 42 days? He was commenting (I think...) on someone not paying attention for a period of time and finding their hive had gone from gentle to unruly. But, would this hold true for requeening the hive as well? One could expect 42 days of the old attitude before it changes to a new?

    And, to build on that, if one takes a swarm, let's it operate with it's swarm queen for "one brood cycle" (21 days) then requeens it, would the attitude of the first queen's offspring be enough to change the swarm's original temperament or by there only being one brood cycle (if I'm understanding that term correctly) would the changes be minor and of shorter duration before the second queen's offspring replaced all?

    And am I so confused I can't even ask the questions in a coherent manner?
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Your questions are coherent, but I think they compare to "what do I do when they start dropping h-bombs"?

    I think you are much too concerned over a very minor chance of anything going wrong.

    Again, just my .02.
     

  3. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    The simpler way to look at it is that once a new queen starts laying, any worker bee or brood that came from the previous queen will have a certain limited lifespan- say +/- 6 weeks maybe?- and once they all die off all the newer workers will be from the new queen. So if you figure 6 weeks lifespan PLUS maybe a week to account for the unhatched brood from the old queen still developing, then by 7 weeks after the old queen is gone most active bees will probably be from a new queen. Just guessing on the lifespan thing, but the method of figuring might be practical.
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Add to that, the queen's pheromones have a direct effect on the actions of the workers, too. The new queen may make the older bees gentler before they expire.
     
  5. Skyhigh

    Skyhigh New Member

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    *sigh* I know. But... ;) Sorry if it sounds like I'm obsessing, but this question was actually brought on by a post in my local board from someone who has a "hot" hive in his residential bee yard. (Caught my attention, of course. :D) He thought to figure out which it was then bag and burn it. Recommendations were to requeen instead. He was worried about his neighbors (and his already-in-need-of-mowing grass.) So I was wondering just how long the bad attitude would last if he did requeen.

    Yes! that is what I was wondering! And, that is really interesting. (Oh, no. You have my mind spinning off on another tangent now... :eek:)

    Yeah, that's kind of what I figure, but I would think the attitude would change before all the hot bees were dead. Just by the percentage of types of bees. (Or that is what I hope. :D)

    Thanks for the replies!
     
  6. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    One well known fact about honeybees. They will always keep all our heads spinning. That's what makes them so interesting. :thumbsup: :D
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    first off the bees that come with the swarm (I am assuming the swarm was not secondary in nature with a virgin at the helm) are the queens daughters.

    population is the one variable that you don't know at this point in time from the swarms that you have collected. typically a swarm of almost any kind (a very hungry swarm is excluded here) is extremely docile. once the population explodes their defensive characteristics are much more obvious.
     
  8. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    Re-queening will change the behavior of any hive. Re-queening also works for several diseases, funguses and parasites since the brood cycle is broken and the new, hopefully younger queen is healthier. Swarms, unless multiple swarms, are always accompanied by the old queen. Nature probably has a reason for sending her to a new home. It might behoove you to requeen the old lady. I hated that word growing up. Almost as much as pinching the old queens!
     
  9. Skyhigh

    Skyhigh New Member

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    As my kids would say, "I know! Right?" :lol: I've gotten so I'm not misreading it, but I still can't say either of those things in my house without someone giving me a funny look.

    Oh, and I'm definitely requeening. The people from the extension office and the inspector all came across as extremely competent, knowledgeable people. Meanwhile, my few months of studying/reading and 1-1/2 weeks of personal bee exposure do not impress me as sufficient enough to make any decisions contrary to the best management suggestions.