Tests Show Most Store Honey Isn’t Honey

Discussion in 'Bee News' started by GrayGuy, Nov 20, 2012.

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  1. GrayGuy

    GrayGuy New Member

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  2. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    this is a great article grayguy, and the list of store honey with no pollen is excellent. store honey ain't honey in my opinion anyway. from a label made by mann lake i think, "how do you know if it's pure honey if you don't know the beekeeper?!"
     

  3. Omie

    Omie Active Member

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    Indeed that is a terrific article, thanks! The article has so much fascinating and informative info!
     
  4. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Yes, great article. I remember reading this about the time I was in the early stages of researching my eventual passion of keeping bees...
     
  5. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Barely a year goes by without our national beekeepers organization detecting AND CONFISCATING "suspicious" honey (also know as artificially manufactured honey--home made in vats from sugar and other ingredients). If I'm not mistaken, some of the swindlers have been brought to court.
    Their ain't nothing like the real thing.!!! We need to make people aware of the fact that not all "honey" is really honey.
     
  6. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    ef~
    "Their ain't nothing like the real thing.!!! "

    :amen:
     
  7. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood New Member

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    Great article, GrayGuy. "the FDA does not consider ‘ultra-filtered’ honey to be honey,” That says it all. That means that the majority of products on shelves is a not honey, but a honey flavored product.
     
  8. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    My wife and I went to Walmart last week and checked out there honey section, very large, and every bottle,jar,and sqeezy thing had a expiration date, wait a sec, honey does not go bad, not real honey anyways, makes you wonder where they are getting all this sugar water junk.
     
  9. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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  10. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    That's ok as long as they don't start putting expiration dates on birth certificates! :shock:
     
  11. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    The way the world is today, putting them on marriage license would save a lot of money.
     
  12. GrayGuy

    GrayGuy New Member

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    Happy you enjoyed. Have a great Thanksgiving, ya'll.
     
  13. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    I doubt that anything will come of it. Policing costs money and the pressure is on to reduce regulatory costs. The funny honey is not causing blatant illness like contaminated meat does so it does not get much public indignation. Politics is what influences the powers that be! If honey demand was such that they could tax it llike alcohol and tobacco, they would be all over it like stink on a fish!
     
  14. Big Bear

    Big Bear New Member

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    personally, I think that pollen affects the quality of the honey, but it isn't what makes honey what it is.

    Honey is made from nectar with pollen being nearly coincidental as it is brought in and stored near and with honey. This is why cut comb honey is so much more full-bodied than extracted honey. The pollen that remains in the comb adds to the immediate flavor. The more honey is filtered and pollen removed, the flavor is affected but the state of being honey is not changed.

    The not-honey I think of on the store shelves is that "honey" that has been blended with things like syrup or other products.
     
  15. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Big Bear--you're on the verge of becoming a "Senior Member". Keep it up with your great posts. (You can expect a congrats from Perry when you make the mark. He's an expert at spotting special forum events). Reward yourself with a chunk of comb honey.
    :grin:
     
  16. Big Bear

    Big Bear New Member

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    I don't know how I would manage that. i would think I am one of the most scarce people on the forum.
     
  17. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    With the 100 posts mark you've made the grade. Congrats and Whoopie.:thumbsup:
     
  18. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    What ef said! :thumbsup:
     
  19. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    To start off, I don't disagree with anything that has been previously posted but this article raises a few concerns.
    First the link to this article is on a sight that is from a law firm that is on the lookout for the next big class action suit. So there could be a push to persuade public opinion.
    Other than taste which is not very accurate or scientific the best way to test for a honeys origins is thru the grains of pollen.

    Big Bear's comments are right on point.
    I will add to this that having a sister in law that had allergy's to almost all pollens she could eat honey that was ultra filtered so no pollen grains remained, but would have a severe reaction to raw honey.
    I studies where the use of bees and the testing of hive products has been used to test for environmental contamination as well as natural occurring minerals and elements in the environment. Studied have found that nectar, in the way the bees process and covert it in to honey is a poor product to sample as little shows up in it. Pollen on the other hand contains residue from almost all the environmental contaminates in the area leached out of the soils or from the air thru the plants.
    Whether the consumer wants to buy ultra filtered honey, raw honey or even homey comb it is a personal discussion and judgement call It is our job to give them all the facts and let them make their own personal choice.

    I have a problem when someone makes a statement or wrights a headline "Tests Show Most Store Honey Isn’t Honey" when in fact all they could not prove is the floral source of the honey they were sampling. When the bees visit the flower of the alfalfa plant they use their long tongue to reach around to sip the nectar. In doing so they avoid the pollen from the alfalfa so any pollen in the honey is from other sources of pollen in the area. using their way of thinking. Alfalfa honey is not alfalfa honey cause it has no alfalfa pollen in it.

    Limit straining methods on honey aloud for importation into our country's so they can be tested for contaminates and sources, to ensure a safe produce. other tan this the packing plants are under federal jurisdiction and have to meet tougher standards than any of us do. Most brands are trying to provide the purest product possible to there customer. the way to achieve this is to filter anything that dose not belong in honey. Dose Pollen belong in honey? Personal decision!
     
  20. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    we had Mr Bryant as a speaker at the fairly recent state beekeeper's convention. he did a nice job.

    basically Mr Bryant point (I think??) comes down to this..... why would anyone spend lots of time and lots of money on very expensive and not easy to maintain equipment to remove every bit of pollen from honey when older, more reliable and less costly technology will do the same job and still remove 98% of the pollen. why is removing this extra 2% so important?