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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Plant Terrestrial plant Herbaceous plant Flowering plant Annual plant

About everything else seems to be drying up in this heat and no recent rain. The bees were working this about 5:00 PM. It's about 4 or 5 feet tall. Does anyone know what it's called?
 

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I agree with DLMKA, sweet clover. yellow and white types, the yellow blooms first in my area. The bees tend to like the white better and is one of our top honey producers. Jack
 

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Here's a link to sweet yellow clover...it gets pretty tall by the looks of it. I actually mixed some of that in my clover seed for my food plot....didn't know it got tall like that either.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melilotus_officinalis

I read that white is like a rainbow to bees...and they can't see red...makes me wonder why beesuits are white...seems with that theory we look like a big pretty flower to them and they would want to eat us...LMAO!
 

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a snip...
I don't know, does clover get 4-5 feet tall on stalks?

tecumseh:
yes it does and although not native to a lot of places it does tend to show up anywhere folks are feeding horses (I assume it comes in on the hay). in the Dakotas at this time of year the yellow variety cover 'everything' and it produces a very luxurious smell that envelopes the entire land.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well, I hope there is more of it around here, but we only have one plant in the yard that we can see.
 

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Dr. Buzz,
if you want to, go to your local Central Tractor, or Agway Store, and order a pound or two of white sweet clover and Yellow Sweet Clover don't forget to ask of the innocolant that will allow the seed to germinate and protect from nemotodes in the soil until it starts to grow and get established. You can get seeding rates in the same stores, or online, soil prep isn't too bad, planted over a acre in Pa when I lived thereas was previously stated takes two years of growth for it to mature to blooming size/ age. A thought, you might try buckwheat seed, grows almost anywhere, a bit more soil prep is needed, but when buckwheat yields--it can yield great volumes of nectar, buckwheat honey is very dark, thick, and strong, but highly prized in many areas...don't know how much land you own, might also consider white dutch clover, as lawn cover, only gets to 4 - 6 inches high, yields blossoms same season, reseeds itsels, and grows densely great to fill spots in your lawn, with minimun care.
Barry
 

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We sowed both Yellow sweet clover and buckwheat together this spring in a small plot like 12 feet by 50 feet to see how it would do...not a science major or anything but read that one balances the other... buckwheat came up first and was beautiful! Six inch plants and then we had two back to back freezes we lost nearly all of the buckwheat. To the good the clover has filled in nicely, and as mentioned we wont see too much flowering this year, if at all. We will reorder the buckwheat again and resow it into the clover now that we know it sprouts really quick. I was really pleased with this company in Vermont - Dirt Works. Shipped really quick and the seed was very healthy, all sprouted, even though it was very poor soil... and most of all - organic! :thumbsup::thumbsup: Only ordered once but very good I think.
 

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Buckwheat is and was used as a green manure, plowed under before it went to seed, but is frost ( as you found out ) sensitive. The various clovers were likewise used, now we get to use them for our purposes ( and the bees lol)
Barry
 
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