they are GONE ??

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by 2kooldad, Oct 4, 2011.

  1. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    the new colony i just got from the cutout is GONE....i dont know what i did wrong but they left...i watched them all weekend an they seemed fine...i went to work monday an when i came home they were all gone save a few nurse bees that musta hatched after they left...no dead bees but every comb i put in the box was loaded with worms when i checked to see what happened when i saw no bees at the front door....soooo....what happened...were they infested when i got them an when they left the worms went nuts....i found some SHB when i got them but not a whole lot...combs looked fine...did the bees take off cause i put them next to another hive...i fed them...heck the first night i did everything but brush their teeth for em....i need to know what happened so i dont do it again...with that many bees and i personaly put the queen in the box why would they leave the hive....was it something i did or the worms ???
     
  2. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I would guess likely the shb 'worms'. I don't much do rip outs here anymore simply because during the season when cutting out hives is possible the damage you do to the comb greatly encourages the shb. After discussing this problem with another 'somewhat local beekeeper' who does removals we decided that sucking bees out with a vacum and starting them over just like they were a package was likely the safest route for removals.
     

  3. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    SHB are attracted to the alarm pheromone that they put off when they are under stress or attack.

    Not sure how your cutout went, but disturbances prior to the cutout (pre-cutting, moving, etc.), the process of doing the cutout, and the bees confused once placed (bees challenging the new kids on the block), can all add up to huge problems. SHB will fly in from great distances. Throw in the damaged comb, new positioning of the stores (and bees not protecting it the same) and bees now focused on other tasks such as keeping brood warm (out of the original position), and SHB are a real danger and threat to cutouts.

    I find high SHB counts in about half of the wall extractions from the start. Not sure why. Maybe the wall of a home provides much more places for SHB to live and hang out as compared to the standard hive.

    I think obsconding may be higher than in the past given all that bees face today. And it may actually be a learning process where the bees know that there is a point when worms take over, that you just move on.

    I like the idea of a vacuum approach.
     
  4. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    i like the bee vac idea as well....it would make things much better....thats it !!!! Im building one this weekend...well maybe....i gotta get an vac motor....hmmmmm....i need to study the plans. I wonder if they are on a tree on my 30 acres...if ida had a swarm box out they might of went there...guess i should do that to....how long can you leave a swarm box out...all year....i saved that board from the cut out cuz its bee seasoned...i can make a swarm box with that....get that hive smell going from the get go....anybody have a reason i shouldnt do that ??
     
  5. JPthebeeman

    JPthebeeman New Member

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    We have SHB here, they're in just about every hive and even fly with swarms but you guys in Florida seem to have some serious SHB problems. It seems such a shame to 86 all of that wonderful brood comb. If I was confronted with what you went through on a consistent basis I would transfer brood comb into something such as a nuc. I would jam pack the nuc with bees and cage the queen for the first two days to anchor the bees.

    If still on a consistent basis SHB took over then I guess I would 86 all comb and treat them like a swarm as well.


    ...JP
     
  6. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Once the SHB larva start to hatch, the bees won't hang around long. Even a swarm placed in that hive now will abscond. You need to clean and air it until you no longer smell the SHB mess before using it again.

    The plywood should make a good swarm trap.
     
  7. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    well Iddee....hatch they did...you warned me that the comb i didnt use would get them fast...i didnt figure on the comb i did use getting them...at least not like that....looked like a million octopus moved in...lol...how fast do SHB hatch....it was only 2 full days an 3 nights...i dont remember reading about SHB hatch times...also Cracker bee told me he liked your bee vac better than the one he made...do you have plans for it on the build/tech page ????
     
  8. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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  9. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    I made an Iddee-Vac, per the photos, and can definitely recommend it. An excellent design.
     
  10. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    Bullseye Bill does a lot of cutouts in this area. He has quit trying to save the comb since we started seeing SHB. He uses permacomb in all his hives. Hives them just like a package. On another note it is not uncommon for bees to abscond from cutouts. A lot of times if you can catch them soon after they leave the hive you will find them balled up like a swarm somewhere close.
     
  11. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    2kool writes:
    I wonder if they are on a tree on my 30 acres

    tecumseh:
    'if' the queen had been clipped the absconding swarm wouldn't have gone far. perhaps those 'florida best practices' ain't such a bad idea after all?

    ps... I do mark queens, but have never really clipped many queens. I can see why clipping more queens will be something I will likely need to do more of in the future.
     
  12. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    I mark mine as well....but a clipped queen would have saved me a colony....lessons learned....ima just burn the old comb from any more i do....as fast as that happened who knows how many worms made it to the ground...that means more SHB later an i dont want to breed beatles.....can i use any vac motor on it ???
     
  13. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    before SHB showed up here we could pull honey take our time extracting. These days you best not pull more than you can extract in a couple of days. Or you will start seeing SHB larva hatching in your supers