think i got some sort disease

Discussion in 'Pests and Diseases' started by L00ker123, Feb 28, 2012.

  1. L00ker123

    L00ker123 New Member

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    I have attached a couple of pictures. The frame is one of many in the hive that looks like this. There are few brood cappings at all. There is a big number of dead bees both larvae and adult bees. I have 2 hives the other one also has a few frames that look like this but it has at least 4 times the number of bees in the hive. Anybody have any idea what it might be? can it be fixed?
     

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  2. L00ker123

    L00ker123 New Member

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    the larvae is very wet and gooey. the adult dead appear to be dried out.
     

  3. Larus

    Larus New Member

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    Is your hive still queenright? Are there eggs? The first thing I think when I see the spotty brood pattern is: the queen has failed or has died.
    If your hive has gone queenless, that could explain all of this - without the queen, as bees die, no new bees replace them, and eventually there are too few adult bees to keep the brood warm or dry, so the brood dies too.

    I also saw pictures of frames like this in an article from the most recent issue of Bee Culture magazine. There, the problem was eventually traced to a Nosema ceranae infection overwhelming the hive. Maybe it'd be a good idea to test those dead bees for nosema spore count.
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I would call your state bee inspector and ask her to come look at them. It is a free service and she is a very nice lady.

    Nancy Ruppert Star, NC 27356 (910) 690-9555
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    larus writes:
    I also saw pictures of frames like this in an article from the most recent issue of Bee Culture magazine. There, the problem was eventually traced to a Nosema ceranae infection overwhelming the hive.

    tecumseh:
    that would be my first guess also. could also be starvation if there was no or little stores in the hive.

    were there any alive adult bees in this hive?
     
  6. L00ker123

    L00ker123 New Member

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    yes, the top box also had 4-5 frames of honey. I fed them them sugar syrup all winter with a grease patty also. We have had a very mild winter here in NC. There are still quite a few adult bees alive and very actively flying around. So, if it the Nosema infection can they be saved or do I need to do anything to keep the other hive from getting it also?
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    if it is nosema and you wanted to save this hive.... sugar water with just a bit of fumidil fed directly over the existing cluster does work. mind you the fumidil is expensive but you don't need to feed a hive much of this*. how you feed is also important here.... any kind of mass feeding device (frame or top feeder) WILL result in more dead bees in the feeder <this is just an inevitable side consequence of nosema...ie the affected bees are hungry and weak.

    a side bar and just for your continued education.... frames like those in the picture in nosema affect hives have this unkempt unattended look. a frame of brood from a healthy hive looks very well attended and has a dull polished appearance. a nosema affect frame appear somewhat soiled and lack the dull polished appearance... to me the edges of the cells looks a bit frayed.

    *perhaps a gallon of syrup + a few grams of fumidil. fumidil syrup must be shielded from sunlight until it is consumed since it will decompose when exposed to sunlight.
     
  8. L00ker123

    L00ker123 New Member

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    i am going to try to to save them. Do you think I need to treat the other hive as well? The ones that are living are collecting pollen already. They seem to be clustering more in the upper frames than the lower ones.
     
  9. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Since in an apiary there is always at least a small amount of wandering from one hive to another (or even "bumping" contact while working the flowers) one infected hive can easily infect another.
    If you have one hive with nosema, treat them all. This is not like avoiding giving an unnecessary treatment as a preventative.
     
  10. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    Did I see varroa in the first pic of pupae and adult bees in that ceramic basin? That is something to take a better look at if in fact you do have mites as well.
    Barry
     
  11. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I myself would disagree with efmesch 'treat all' philosophy <in any number of animal husbandry situation this is often consider to be the proper approach.

    for myself I treat the sick only.
     
  12. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Tec says: "for myself I treat the sick only". :thumbsup:
    I agree with him in principle, the problem is that with nosema it's not so easy to recognize the sickness at an early enough stage. You might possibly diagnose one hive as sick and give treatment, and not spot it in the hive next door. Until you recognize the second hive as sick, it will have had a chance to re-infect the first, or pass on the nosema to a third hive. :doh:
     
  13. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    unless I am mistaken, good weather and nectar flows coming on in short order, the nosema issue normally clears itself up actually the good weather which will allow the bees to get out regularly.
    Barry