Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I received five (marked) queens last Wed. and put them in 5 frame nuc's Thurs. with pulled brood frames (capped) from some of my strong hives with nurse bees. I checked them today (monday) and all were released, Found two queens on frames with their circle of attendants:thumbsup:. Found one with her attendants and a supersedure cell on the next frame over (capped?) and did not find the other two queens, but did find three capped supersedure cells in the middle of one frame in one nuc, and four supersedure cells in the other nuc (two frames had two supersedure cells each):shock: These frames (3 with brood and bees in each nuc) did not have queen cells or cups when i pulled them, i looked them all three times to make sure i didn't take the donor hives queen and almost all the brood was capped. Is it possible that they built queen cells and capped them in 5 days?:???: I've been at this a long time and never had this happen this quick. Jack
P.S. i pulled these brood frames with bees last Wed. and they set in the bed of my truck over night,i set the nucs out and put the queen cages in around 11:00am the next day, Thurs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
277 Posts
I had something similiar happen with a package I put in this year. They had developed a queen cell within the first two weeks, which I thought was good because I could not locate the queen during that inspection. (marked queen at that) I left the cell thinking great at least I will just suffer days of production versus having to purchase another queen, when I went back into the hive two weeks later there was my marked queen! I don't think the replacement queen fared too well.....
Just when ya think your gettin' learned up; ya get schooled! :grin:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,683 Posts
Its fairly common for bees to supercede in packages and when adding queens making nucs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
419 Posts
Just sounds like they didn't accept the new marked queen at first so they raised a few replacements from the first eggs available.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The thing that got me is, the frames of brood were mostly capped and no sign of queen cells or eggs. When i checked back in (5 days) here was these full size queen cells and capped? There not supposed to do that in 5 days:???: Jack
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,487 Posts
a snip..
i pulled these brood frames with bees last Wed. and they set in the bed of my truck over night

tecumseh....
I think this may be simply in the wait time between making up nucs and placing the queens into the nucs. it doesn't take queenless bees in good population long to start cells (and the rule is once started the bees will finish the job). so... I suspect what you thought were superscedure cells were in fact emergency queen cells.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Went through those two nucs with supersedure cells today that i had put new queens in. The one with 3 queen cells had two with the bottom ate out and the third one was gone?i'm guessing they have a virgin queen. The other nuc that had two frames with two supersedure cells each? well there was no sign of a queen cell on one frame and the other frame that had two capped queen cells,the cell had been chewed open almost to the bottom and the larva and royal jelly was exposed. I'm thinking this was the work of the new queen that i put in, but i didn't find her and she's marked. Any other ideas.:???: Jack
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,487 Posts
a Jack snip..
The one with 3 queen cells had two with the bottom ate out and the third one was gone?

tecumseh:
queen cells are often destroyed by any proper functioning queen although certainly virgins (and these need not be from that specific hive since these seem to wander a bit) will definitely take care of any queen cells. I myself find that too many queen cells sometime effect my introduction success* since the hive in question has focused their attention on the cells and not the queen in the introduction cage. rechecking along the route to getting a new queen laying and with some larvae in the box is something everyone should consider. newly started queen cells are just not that easy to spot but after even a couple of days after starting are quite easy to spot and destroy.

*almost without exception after I have tossed introduction cages into newly made up nucs when I come back later to check the boxes to assure the queen has been release the unreleased queens also have queen cells in the nuc. with these I find it is useful to come back a day or so later and recheck for additional cells <yesterday reminded me of how useful this habit is since the queen in the introduction cage was an II Cordovan and therefore a bit pricey.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top