This years beekeeping

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by crazy8days, Jan 21, 2013.

  1. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    My question for my second year of beekeeping does this sound like a good idea. Saying my 2 hives will make it. My strong hive (swarm) I will split this spring. They seemed to be good producer but aggressive. Will Queen the one split with a New World Carniolan queen. Other hive was a weaker hive I had to combined last fall. Will re-queen with a New World Carniolan queen. Ordered 5 packages-they are wintering in Florida. With basically ending up with 2 nucs, one hive and 5 packages and saying we don't have a drought what are my chances of having a honey year?
     
  2. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a snip...
    what are my chances of having a honey year?

    tecumseh...
    I do not know anything of your area but here late winter rains and the amount of water in the ground as we approach spring is a pretty good indication if I will or will not have a honey crop. in other places where I have kept bees (sw North Dakota for example) the amount of accumulated snow was a good indicator of the kind of honey crop you could expect. record setting honey crops are typically impossible to predict since they almost always depend on a number of unrelated things happening in some pattern (or about the same probabilities as drawing an inside straight).
     

  3. indypartridge

    indypartridge New Member

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    Actually, a lot of Indiana beeks (including myself) had quite a good honey crop despite the drought last year.

    That said, your best bet for producing honey is from your overwintered colonies. If you're looking to split the strong one, I'd suggest reading up on "cut down" splits, which are done to maximize honey production. Essentially, you split so that one hive gets the nearly all the brood and nurse bees, and the other gets all the foragers. This allows the forager colony to focus on honey production since they don't have brood to care for.
     
  4. Omie

    Omie Active Member

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    if you do this, make sure there is a good flow starting when you do it. And you are removing the queen and letting them make a new one, not giving them a queen cell or new queen. You can put some supers on and don't bother with a queen excluder at all for 3 weeks, since they won't have a laying queen anyway yet. This has the added benefit of really knocking down the mite population in that hive, too.

    Added: also make sure you wait until there are Spring drones flying before you start the process of forcing a hive to make a new queen. No drones=no mated queen.
     
  5. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    I'll have to look that up. What's the reason I can't re-queen the one?
     
  6. BoilerJim

    BoilerJim New Member

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    Brett,

    Where ya gettin your New World Carniolan queens? I might be lookin to buy a couple myself.
     
  7. indypartridge

    indypartridge New Member

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    Because the queen will lay eggs. The idea behind this kind of split is that with no kids to take care off, all the adults can work full time on making honey. As Omie noted, timing the split to a nectar flow is important.
     
  8. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    Yes Jim. Have 2 ordered from Honey Run Apiaries. If you decide you want a couple I'll tack it on my order and we can save on shipping if that works with you.