Three week hive check

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by letitbee, May 13, 2012.

  1. letitbee

    letitbee New Member

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    I have been working a lot of hours so I haven't been able to get in the hives til today. Everything seems okay, lots of brood found both of my beautiful queens but the little buggers are laying brood out from the center of the boxes. The frames I gave them were fully drawn with comb and a few frames of honey from my hive that died out over the winter. I put brood frames in the center of the hives and put frames with more stores and less brood comb out toward the edges. Both queens seem to prefer to lay in the frames with the most stores. I am happy with the amount of capped brood and there is a lot of uncapped brood as well. All seems to be as it should except for the brood frames being off center. I swapped a few frames of brood towards the center hoping to get the queens interested in them. Am I worrying too much again:roll: There is also hatched brood and the queens are refilling the cells. I installed the packages almost a month to the day and have been too busy at work to watch for any orientation flights but it seems like the numbers of bees I have is not what I expected even though, again, everything seems okay. No queen or supercedure cells either...it just seems like the bees are being a bit lazy but it has been cool and rainy for the last week or so. Help me sleep tonight someone!:lol:
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Everything sounds good to me, nothing to lose sleep over, that's for sure. :thumbsup:
     

  3. dr.buzz

    dr.buzz New Member

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    I wouldn't worry. Since the frame usually has brood in the middle with stores arching above it, maybe the queens are replicating that by laying in frames that already have stores in them. Once your number of foragers increase, new incoming stores can be put in the proper place on your drawn comb frames and she'll happily lay in them, too. I don't buy packages but I do start nucs with a queen and a few frames of bees when I do splits, and it just takes them some time to gain critical mass. Usually, if you have a good laying queen, everything will be what it's supposed to be. Sometimes doing nothing is the hardest thing to (not) do, but it can work wonders.
     
  4. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    Weather plays a critical on how much brood the queen lays. the bees will not raise more brood then they can cover and keep warm. as been stated above typically they will store honey in the upper corners, pollen under the honey in a band across the top of the band. If the weather has been decent, the bees will relax the cluster and start expanding the brood nest. In many ways a package of bees will behave much like a swarm, which infact they are--a shook swarm and energetically start comb building, and queen looking to lay eggs in anything that even remotely resembling a open cell. As I said many time in the past--for bees it is math not magic for survival, with our help we need to have the bees population peeking near the very beginning of the spring nectar flow this ensured maximum number of foragers on the scene when the nectar flows starts to intensify Down here in Florida, our spring flow ends in a few weeks from now, so if colonies are not peeked as of a few weeks ago, you and they missed it. and feeding the bees will be the order of the day in June through July until the beginning of the fall flows.( assuming that there is one.)
    Barry