ticks

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by volt, Jun 5, 2013.

  1. volt

    volt New Member

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    My yard and bushy area has a major tick problem this year (I have about an 1 acre and a half that I just let grow because I'm lazy. I'm picking them off me, the dog, and the six year old daily. Never seen it this bad... With two bee hives I don't want to spray the area but was wondering if there were other solutions? Other than cutting it back of course.
     
  2. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    guineas will take care of the problem in short order
     

  3. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    G3, if I get some guineas is there anything I need to provide them with other than water? Are they like chickens with feeding and shelter?
    Ticks are the worst I've seen them in the 13 years I've been here.
     
  4. volt

    volt New Member

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    Don't guinea's also eat bees?
     
  5. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Heck I don't know, i ain't got none of them squawking things.

    They are bug eaters for sure though, not sure if they would mess with the bees, doubt they would.
     
  6. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Guineas eat like chickens, plus.
    They roost in trees, so no house needed. They should be caged and fed for a month or so to realize where home is.
    The six year old will have a year round easter egg hunt looking for the nests and collecting eggs.

    Chickens won't eat the bees, so I doubt the guineas will, either. I had a hive in a yard with guineas for ten years and never had a problem.
     
  7. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    ticks have very porous skin and need moisture to move around. If you've had a wetter than normal spring, that likely accounts for your troubles. Lime disease is nasty, be careful. Deet based Mosquito repellent also works on ticks. Spray it around the cuffs and collar on your clothes only. If it was me, I'd be in there with a brush saw and a flame thrower.
     
  8. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    Our area is > +11 inches of rainfall ahead for this year. That's probably why our ticks are so bad. I'm thinking about guineas myself.
     
  9. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    ticks are bad this year. When I was mushroom hunting I was finding 2 to 3 mushrooms for every tick I picked off. When it got to 2 to 3 ticks for every mushroom I found. I quit hunting mushrooms for the year.:grin:
     
  10. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

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    I've never owned a guinea, but many of the old timers in East Texas kept them. They are voracious bug eaters and make a pretty good substitute for a watch dog. They see everything and cackle to no end if anything comes around them. If you don't find the their nests, you will have plenty of guineas in short order.

    As an aside, Virginia is a beautiful state.
     
  11. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Question: are guinea eggs large enough to make a nice breakfast? :grin: My ears are open...may have to look into this guinea thing...
     
  12. The Bee Guy

    The Bee Guy New Member

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    Guineas make good watch dawgs.
    But if they find your beehives they'll eat every bee you've got.
    Turkey's will do the same thing.
    Ticks are very bad here in North Central Arkansas this year, I mean horrific.
    Last year I had an ole Hen Turkey (wild) that would sit next to my hive and everytime a bee would try to leave she'd eat it.
     
  13. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

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    The fire ant invasion has reached my ranch in Brownwood. The only good thing I have found about them is that they do away with ticks. Fire ants eat the little buggers in double time. We have a modest fire ant population due to our lack of water and rocky soil, but they have completely eradicated our tick population.
     
  14. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

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    The Bee Guy:

    A wild turkey eating my bees would promptly become table fare. Breast of wild turkey chicken fried, with cream gravy, makes a very good meal.
     
  15. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    think I will keep the ticks over fireants any day:grin:
     
  16. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    We never had a problem with Guineas eating bees when we had them? I've wondered about Turkeys? i have several hives in deep woods and edges of farm fields in wild Turkey country, but so far, as far as i know they haven't been a problem? Like iddee said, you need to train them to go into a shed at night, Owls are a predator on Guineas and turkeys that roost in trees. I miss the Guineas and thinking about getting some more, use to find there nest in the buckbrush in fence rows, never ate a Guinea egg (but have ate Guinea, all dark meat) they are all most the size of a chicken egg, and if i remember right they are speckled. They are noisy and drive some people nuts, but to me,it's a noise that makes a farm a farm.:thumbsup: Jack
     
  17. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    The bee guy, I don't know where you get your info, but I had a hive in a friend's yard for ten years. He had 20 to 50 guineas, depending on the time of the year. They never bothered the bees. His chickens would gather at the hive at dusk and pick up wax moths from the sides of the hives. They never bothered the bees, either.

    The eggs are readily edible, but the shell is much harder to crack than a chicken egg.
     
  18. kebee

    kebee Active Member

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  19. BSAChris

    BSAChris New Member

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    Will guinea hens survive a Wisconsin winter? I like the idea of free range chickens, living in trees, eating ticks, not needing me... but I bet when winter rears its head they'll need a hand ... to become fancy dinners. Hmm...
     
  20. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Beneficial nematodes work in moist soil, eat the eggs and larva of fleas, chiggers, grubworms and more. Cost a bit, last a year if you keep the yard watered, don't eat bees. They do however eat fire ants.