Time of year to treat mites??

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by wstanell, Aug 11, 2019.

  1. wstanell

    wstanell New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Live in southeastern Pennsylvania when is best time to treat for mites August September July? Also do you use Formic Acid or Apigard??
     
  2. DBLBee

    DBLBee New Member

    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Hello wstanell.....My understanding is start in early Fall...I too am new at this and this year I plan on fogging with mineral spirts...I will have to get everclear for the Acid fog but they dont sell it here in Washington state...need to take a trip to Oregon ...but for now I will use the mineral spirit and mite away strips.....Good luck too you

    Happy Bee keeping
     

  3. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    3,457
    Likes Received:
    75
    Trophy Points:
    48
    I am going to defer to northern members for timing, I still have brood here, and will be treating as soon as I have all hives basically stable, I will use oxalic acid crystals. I do have the little vaporizer and battery, and my gas mask. They work really well. but it is still too hot here to treat, I'm in Texas, it's 100 degres
     
  4. camero7

    camero7 Member

    Messages:
    720
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    18
    I live in Central Massachusetts. I use oxalic acid vapor and I'm treating now. 4 treatments one week apart, works best for me.
     
    Gypsi likes this.
  5. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    3,457
    Likes Received:
    75
    Trophy Points:
    48
    I'm about to start treatment, looking for one of those electric battery jumpers that you use Camero7, you know where I can find one?
     
  6. camero7

    camero7 Member

    Messages:
    720
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    18
  7. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood Member

    Messages:
    929
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    18
    I got one at Harbor Freight. They are probably at Walmart too.
     
  8. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood Member

    Messages:
    929
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Yikes! 4 treatments a week apart! Wow, Oxalic Acid is intended to be used during a broodless period and only once! Think what you are doing to your queens and her tender areas like her antennae.
     
  9. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood Member

    Messages:
    929
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Formic acid is temperature sensitive, as I recall. Apiguard is intended for use after the supers come off. It is not as temperature sensitive. In Kansas, now is the time to do mite treatments. The eggs that are being laid now will be the bees that overwinter in the colony. As the temperature reached 90 today, I am using Apiguard.
     
  10. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    3,457
    Likes Received:
    75
    Trophy Points:
    48
    I have 100's this week, I was going to start with oxalic acid if bees were broodless but at 100 I'm not sure if I want to do that. No way I could use Apiguard for a month at least
     
  11. camero7

    camero7 Member

    Messages:
    720
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Nonsense. don't know where you got your info but that is standard with brood present. I've been doing it for about 15 years and have yet to lose a queen, brood or have the hive set back. Do some research my friend.
     
  12. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    3,457
    Likes Received:
    75
    Trophy Points:
    48
    If brood is present it's every 7 days. In the absence of brood, one treatment will take care of the mites
     
  13. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood Member

    Messages:
    929
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    18
    I had the privilege of hearing Dr. Juliana Rangel, Texas A & M Dept. of Entomology, last March. During a presentation on varroa mite, Dr. Rangel cautioned beekeepers about over treating with OA. I only mentioned one of the reasons she gave. Randy Oliver, http://scientificbeekeeping.com/oxalic-acid-questions-answers-and-more-questions-part-1-of-2-parts/ writes, "Spring/summer application(s)* This is much less effective, since oxalic does not kill mites in the brood. There is some controversy as to summertime application (see Does it Harm the Bees?). You’re on your own here, but the bees seem to handle one shot well (even at high doses); multiple applications are more questionable." "Asking around, the jury’s still out, in my opinion as to whether OA summer treatment is worthwhile, due to relatively low efficacy, and demonstrated damage to the brood (see below). The later in the season, and the smaller the brood nest, the more effective the treatment is."
    I posted an opinion contrary to your statement because I don't want new beekeepers or potential beekeepers reading statements such as yours and assuming that your information is backed by research. I would hope they would do more research, on their own, before implementing treatment plans. Unfortunately, many will read statements made by other beekeepers and think it is gospel. Information on forums, such as this one, are usually opinion based. You are allowed to post your opinion and that is fine. It doesn't mean that I can't post an apposing viewpoint.
     
  14. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Active Member

    Messages:
    838
    Likes Received:
    82
    Trophy Points:
    28
    you are wrong about oxilic acid vapor treatments....oxilic acid vapor has little to no effects on the queen or brood and can be used consecutively for 3 to 4 weeks to get any mites that were hiding in brood chambers...you need to do some googling as your info is incorrect, not looking to start a pissing match, but you are posting wrong info...
     
  15. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    3,457
    Likes Received:
    75
    Trophy Points:
    48
    I may not get 4 treatments a week apart, but one isn't enough either. Unless I hit just perfect at the broodless point. I've got guys working here this sunday so will probably wait til monday to open hives and treat for mites
     
  16. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood Member

    Messages:
    929
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    18
    I have cited some dependable sources. That is what I base my information on. Have you got any sources you can cite that backs up what you are saying?
    Have you noticed a loss in brood after all that sublimation? Do you have to kill every single varroa mite, or is dropping the mite count down to a percentage your bees can handle enough?
    These are some things for you to think about.
    No need to respond, I won't be back.
     
  17. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Active Member

    Messages:
    838
    Likes Received:
    82
    Trophy Points:
    28

    LOL..its amazing how some people get so butt hurt if the world doesnt stop on every word they say..this is an open discussion forum, so difference of opinion gets discussed ..
    and yes I do have reputable resources to back up what I say..
     
  18. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    3,457
    Likes Received:
    75
    Trophy Points:
    48
    I have experience. to be honest many years I only get one treatment in. I want it to be when the hive is broodless. I have seen the mite drop when the fall bees hatch if I did not get a broodless treatment in, i use screened bottom boards and stickies and on a double deep I've seen a mite drop of 600. so if I am treating when there is brood I darn sure treat more than once.