time to work on stump-o-bees

Discussion in 'Swarms, Cut outs, and Trap outs' started by Zookeep, Jan 14, 2014.

  1. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    trying something new rather then cut open the stump I put it in my back yard and attached a box over the opening, robbing this time of year is ungodly and to cut the stump would end up being a mess, in the box is 5 wet deep frames, the hole between there comb and the wet frames is about 5 inches in diameter and comb to comb is about 4 inches apart, I hope the queen will just move over.
     

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  2. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    well, after waiting a while I opened up the box and they didnt even start to move into it, even with 5 wet frames in it, so I opened the top and the bottom of the stump(had it screened off) and started blowing smoke in the bottom, all of 5 min went by and the queen was at the top of the stump with a clump of bees, into a queen cage she went and into the nuc, after about 10 min I realized that there were alot more bees then I thought, I doubled up on the nucs and added another 5 frames, all the bees moved over real nice and easy, the stumps empty and they should raid it when its warm in the morning.
     

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  3. cstephen

    cstephen New Member

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    Zookeep,

    That’s ingenious. I’m dealing with a similar situation and hadn’t thought of this. I’d have to cut more off the top off of the stump I have, as the cavity doesn’t appear to extend all the way. At least there is no sign of bees up that far although I screened it anyway for transport home. Unfortunately my chain saw blade is nowhere near as long as the tree guy’s who sawed this log for me. Also, I’d have to borrow my neighbor’s tractor again to pick this thing up and put it on blocks. The cavity is visible from below, but it was full of old dried out and long abandoned comb.

    The main opening they were using before the tree was felled is about 1 ½†in diameter at the screen in the lower left of the photo. My original thought was to stick a 1 ½†PVC pipe in there and run it upward into a top bar box and seal all openings in the stump so that the only way out is through the box. Put some bar comb in there and wait. When I find the queen upstairs in the box, put in an excluder and wait until the population looks good enough to sustain itself, then disconnect and seal the pipe holes and set a wire trap cone to bring the rest into the top bar. Then either cut up the trunk and try and salvage what honey is left, or just remove the cone and leave it for them and their neighbors to rob.

    However, smoking from below might drive the queen out toward the broken off branch, saving me the trouble of sawing off the top. Maybe if I leave it on the ground and drive the smoke in through the 1 ½†opening it might achieve the same end. Worth a try maybe before I screw around with the PVC pipe.

    Claude Stephenson Bees in Tree.jpg Bees in Tree 2.jpg
     
  4. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Ah ha,,,,I may do this to my latest bee tree section. Thanks for posting Zoo!
     
  5. cstephen

    cstephen New Member

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    Zoo,

    You could be onto something big here, but I’ve got questions now. If you can smoke a queen and her retinue out of a stump, why do we even bother with cutouts and trapouts? Why don’t we just smoke them out?

    I guess I need more info. How much smoke were you pumping from below? Were you just pumping a normal bee smoker or were you doing something else? Have you had success with this method in the past?

    It seems to me that if this method works consistently, you can drill a 2” hole at the top of any colony and a smaller one at the bottom for the nose of your smoker and force out the queen, cage her and put her in a box and wait for everyone else to join her.

    The brood would be lost if you didn’t cut, but the honey could be robbed, especially if you had some fresh drawn comb to put in.

    What am I missing here?

    TIA,

    Claude Stephenson
     
  6. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    normal bee smoker and just keeping a steady flow going, works only with trees I would think, walls and such on houses would be a bad idea.
     
  7. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    It would depend on how far you would need to drive the queen and even possibly the genetics of the bees, most bees react to smoke and escape from it but I have one hive now that it is near impossible to smoke the bees off of the top bars back down between the frames.