Timeline to see eggs after a swarm?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Yankee11, Jul 15, 2012.

  1. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    OK, I hade a hive swarm 2 weeks ago and posted some pictures. There were 6 or 8 queen cells on different frames.

    It's been two weeks and we went in again today. The queen cells were all open at the bottoms. We did not find a queen and did not see any eggs. When should we start seeing eggs.

    But this was something I noticed.

    While we were looking over the frames, the bees were on top of the frames in the brood box and lined up around the top and they were fanning big time. Just like you see when you capture a swarm and have the queen in the box. I really have never noticed the hives doing this on normal inspections.
    I am hoping that is a sign that see is in the hive.
     
  2. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    I would close that box up and not disturb them for another 14 days at least.
     

  3. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Give them a couple of weeks. The queen must become sexually mature, go on her mating flights and then settle in to start laying eggs.
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    What Eddy and G3 said. Not surprising you didn't find a queen, she would be a virgin queen and they are very difficult to spot. They are not much bigger than a worker and are very skittish, running around a lot and hiding, even on the side walls or bottom board during an inspection.
     
  5. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    yankee11,
    what everyone else said here to answer the question about your virgin queen, great advice!

    about this comment:
    "While we were looking over the frames, the bees were on top of the frames in the brood box and lined up around the top and they were fanning big time. I really have never noticed the hives doing this on normal inspections."

    bees will scent fan when a new queen is present to spread her pheromone throughout the hive, however i suspect they were fanning for another reason- how hot is it there? how long did your inspection take? sometimes when we leave the inner cover off too long, the bees will fan, as you described, to re-regulate the temp in the hive.
     
  6. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    I'll throw in another opinion, expanding on what Riverbee said: "bees will scent fan when a new queen is present to spread her pheromone throughout the hive." It could be that the bees were welcoming a recently fertilized queen back to the hive after one of her nuptual flights. When, after waiting two weeks as recommended, you examine the hive, assuming that you find eggs and larvae, you can figure out in reverse if time-wise the queen could have been getting fertilized at the time of your last examination.
     
  7. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    I figure with all those queen cells being opened at the bottom that there has to be a queen in there somewhere. It was actually a pretty mild day, upper 80's I guess. I also noticed that they were very calm. I just assumed if there wasn't a queen in there that they wouldn't have been calm. We'll see in a few weeks.

    Thanks everbody. I will wait 2 more weeks and check again and report what I find.
     
  8. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    yankee11,
    "I figure with all those queen cells being opened at the bottom that there has to be a queen in there somewhere."

    just some helpful info; queen cells are sealed on the 8th day, and emerge on the 16th day. when you speak of 'queen cells being opened at the bottom'~there is a difference between a 'queen cell' and a 'queen cup'. queen cells start out as queen cups, these cups may be empty and may be occupied if a queen has laid an egg in the cup. if the cups are occupied, these may be built into queen cells, which are sealed on the 8th day. many of these cups are started than are successfully completed into cells. the cups are always open on the bottom until they are constructed into cells and sealed. on the 16th day, the queen will chew her way out of the bottom of the cell and it will have sort of a hinged lid to it. better yet...from this pdf,

    there are queen cells in my hive, what should i do

    "Queen Cell Development - The earliest you can identify a viable queen cell is when it is already 3 days old - an egg in a queen cup does not necessarily mean it will become a queen cell. The critical decision for the colony is made when the egg hatches out (Day 3) and the nurse bees start to feed the larva with royal jelly. A queen cup with a pool of royal jelly and a tiny larva in it will almost inevitably be taken full term to become a sealed queen cell. Sealing takes place on Day 8, ie. the larval feeding period is just 5 days. Once queen cells are sealed it is difficult to know how old they are without breaking one open to take a look. There are usually cells covering a range of ages present, so you really need to look at several cells in different part of the hive to be sure. Emergence of queen cells occurs on Day 16, ie. 8 days after Sealing. A newly emerged queen cell usually has a hinged lid attached."

    if your bees were content and calm, most likely you have a queen present, and/or 'in progress'. let them alone for a couple weeks as all said, and looking forward to your post to report your findings then. hopefully you will be saying A QUEEN, I HAVE A QUEEN, and even better, she will have started laying:yahoo:
     
  9. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    These were fully capped queen cells. I posted some pictures of them and these same cells were all opened at the bottoms.

    I have a good feeling shes in there. They were very, very calm. They really acted like a new swarm. alm and fanning like crazy.

    Fingers crossed.
     
  10. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    "These were fully capped queen cells. I posted some pictures of them and these same cells were all opened at the bottoms.
    I have a good feeling shes in there. They were very, very calm. They really acted like a new swarm. alm and fanning like crazy.
    Fingers crossed.
    "

    :thumbsup: