To make a farm!

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by PerryBee, Mar 30, 2012.

  1. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Watched a really interesting Indie flic at our local independant theatre last night!
    While these young folks are our future, I am awed by the challenges that they seem to take in stride.
    Oh, to be young again, I wish at times that I had tried. (After watching this film however, I wonder how many of us have romanticized the notion of small scale farming, not realizing the incredible amount of effort/fortitude required)?
    My hat is off to anyone with the guts to take this on in this day and age! :thumbsup:

    The link is an exlanantion of the documentary. (Scroll to the bottom for 4 little trailers)

    http://tomakeafarm.ca/
     
  2. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    I guess you could say I'm sticking my toe in the water to test things out. I only have 5.5 acres, but that's enough land to try to have a garden, have some bees, going tomorrow to get some chickens, toying with the idea of a goat and a cow. That's probably micro-scale farming (my wife calls it The Farmette). What's ironic is that 20 years ago, I would have never thought of living in the country. Like Foghat sang, I'm a fool for the city. A person sure can change! (I think for the better!).

    Starting off in large scale farming, though, must be incredibly tough. You can't afford to buy farmland to use as farmland. Real estate developers are snatching it all up and the prices are only going up. Then there's the equipment you have to buy. Then you have to hope it rains (but not hail) so that your crop will grow. Then the prices for your produce fluctuates. Then there's competition from overseas. Then there's tons and tons of work.

    I don't think that's the life for me, but I'm sure glad there's people that are doing it for us.

    Close to me is a community of Mennonites. They have a beautiful place (I think it should go on a postcard). They have acres and acres of gardens. They also have a produce stand where people come from miles away to get their good stuff at a fair price. And they do it without modern conveniences. My hat is off to those hard workers. If civilization ever goes down the drain, they'll make it because they retain the knowledge and experience to live off the land.

    Wow, I didn't mean to ramble on like that this morning. :eek:

    Have a great day everyone! :D
     

  3. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Perry with all the bees you have you are in it also and don't even know it. A bad year and you are loosing your bees, honey crop, spending money with no return in sight. Sometimes I think the odds in Vegas or the lottery are better.

    Greg I say go for it, just a hint on the cow though, two will do better than one. I don't see anyway for young people to get into farming unless it is with in the family.
     
  4. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    Up here, to start a large scale farming one has to be a millionaire. Then if you are already a millionaire, why would you go farming?:smile: As G3 said, young people going farming, only if the land and assets are already there, within the family.
    As Slowmodem I am also 5 acres micro farmer. Bees, orchard, garden, and when I move there full time chickens.
    G3 got it right when he says with bees, we are already in it. Checking weather reports, sky, losing sleep over tornado coming from the south, fearing cold snaps... Yes I am a farmer:grin:
     
  5. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Small old time farmers are a dying breed, when big money and Co-Ops take over?? Well we are beginning to see it in the supermarkets now. I live on 60 acres, run 20 cows,keep 20 beehives here, and truck farm 5 acres of it to sell at the local farmers market.Several dollars pass through my hands in a years time,but at the end of the year i'm lucky if i break even:roll:. My family has plenty to eat (makes you feel quilty sometimes) i get plenty of fresh air and exercise, enjoy watching all types of wild life doing their daily survival task, and sometimes help them out.You always have something to do (if you want to) and good neighbors that you can call day or night if you need help, and they'll be there.:thumbsup: You have to earn this kind of life, you can't buy it.:shock: Sorry to ramble Hoary.:grin: This may sound silly, but i wouldn't trade my life style with any of the big money boy's. Jack
     
  6. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    When Katrina came through and shut down all the refineries and pipe lines, and the gas stations were running out of gas, my wife (she can be very profound) made a statement that I still remember that rings true to this day: This country is one truckload away from starvation. In a lot of instances, it seems like people think food grows in the grow-cery store. They'd really be hurting if there was a food shortage or transportation stoppage. I certainly don't survive merely on my garden (I'd have starved long ago!). But it's nice to know I have the ability (and now the experience) to grow food. Plus, my wife has been teaching me how to can and dehydrate and other preservation methods. We're not dooms-day preppers, but it's nice to be able to look a little bit ahead and be prepared for a rainy day.

    Since I've moved out to the country, and have been watching wildlife in the wild, I've learned that nature is usually very harsh. The turkeys that wander through the yard occasionally are certainly not butterballs! It's rough trying to scratch out a living. A hawk or coyote will make quick work of a mouse or other small game. Animals really struggle to survive. Growing up on Disney and Nat Geo, and never giving it much thought, I always just assumed that animals had an easy life. But it's really not. It's fascinating, but harsh.

    OK I'll stop rambling now. :)
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    been there, done that... my hat goes off to Jack for his efforts there while (I would guess) most of his peer group is setting on some porch rocking away. evidently some of us will have to be dragged off to the scrap yard???

    here in the US 'the family farm' is often used as an emotional catch phrase to promote government programs most time designed to financially reward mega farms and millionares.
     
  8. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    you sure are right about that last part Tec, here in TN there is even a program for bees, they will pay 50% of most everything. Wish I could have just kept 50% of my tax dollars!