Today is the day!

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by crazy8days, Aug 18, 2012.

  1. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    Today I'll be pulling off my first supers to extract! See if I got everything.

    Bottles/lids- check
    un-capping knife-check
    wax catcher-um, making one.
    extractor-check
    filters with holding bucket-check
    extra food grade buckets-check
    my own labels :wink:-check

    hope that is the major items. I know I need to cover the floors, walls, ceiling cause if is like how I cook, watch out!

    As for the wax collector here is what I'm thinking. Someone posted that they use the shallow plastic bins that you can get a Walmart that go under your bed. I was thinking about getting 2. One cutting the bottom out and get nylon window screen glue it to the bottom to make a filter. I would was the screen first in soapy water. The other would be to collect the honey. Then just pour off honey when done. what do you think?
     
  2. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    gratz, my extractor comes on monday!!!! I have 1 med super 1 small and 8 deeps to extract that Ive counted atm, not been to the yard 20 miles away in weeks so might have a few there too, not bad for my 1st year:yahoo:
     

  3. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    Just take your time and be careful. You're going to mess up. That's ok. We all do. You'll learn a lot today. And you'll value you're honey a lot more once you've done the work to process it.

    Be sure to have a camera to get a picture of your first drop of honey!

    Have fun and good luck! :D
     
  4. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Oh Boy, you GO, guys! Soooo gratifying!
    I feel the excitement!
     
  5. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    Well, looks like only 7 frames. Thought there was more. One super that I had on one of my home hives wasn't getting drawn out. Seconded deep was still around 80% so took it super off. The 7 I pulled a few are not totally capped. Should I put back in the hive?
     
  6. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    How do you plan on supporting the frames while you slice off the cappings? My (very simple) method is to use a board that goes from side to side over the plastic "collecting pan". Two nails through the board facing down are placed so that they keep it positioned properly on the pan. One more nail, facing up, in the middle of the board serves as a resting point for the side wall of the frame. You can then hold the frame with one hand on the top as it rests on the nail while you uncap with the other hand. If you work your knife upwards, make sure to keep all fingers well behind the protection of the wood of the frame. Slant the frame so that the cappings fall off into the pan.
    Make sure to enjoy the taste of those delicious cappings (as if you need to be told) :rotfl:
     
  7. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    Thanks for the idea! I was going to run a 1X2 across but the nail in the middle is a great idea! Thanks!
     
  8. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Why? If you've taken them off already and the honey is ripe, no reason to return them to the bees--unless they don't have enough stores for themselves (in which case you wouldn't have taken them off in the first place).
     
  9. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    you are such a wise beekeeper. Us new beeks over think too often.
     
  10. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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  11. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I believe the ratio for pulling honey is if the frames are somewhere around 80 to 90% capped, soooooooooo, if you have a bunch that are 100% capped you can add a few that are less than that. A shake test is another way to check the "ripeness" of the honey. Hold any frames that are not completely capped over your hive (horizontally) and shake them. If nectar or honey drips out it is not ripe. If nothing comes out you are good to go.
    If you intend on selling any of your honey and want to be sure that it will not ferment, you may have to invest in a refractometer. It can measure the moisture in your honey and let you know if it exceeds the 18% benchmark (Canada), not sure what the USA requires for moisture content maximums.
     
  12. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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  13. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    Do most of you have a refractometer? once I see what i have I was going to sell some. Now, I'm wondering if I should. THANKS A LOT PERRY!:lol:
     
  14. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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  15. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    I gave it a hard shake test. Nothing dripped or moved. So, thinking im good! Iddee, i'll keep my eye on that one. Thanks
     
  16. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Thanks for the link Iddee. That isn't too bad of a price.
     
  17. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    My apologies Dave, for answering a question directed to Perry--I didn't want to wait on this one. The refractometer is great---but the scale it comes with for reading the water/sugar percentage is not suitable for honey. Wines and beers have a much lower range of sugar concentration and honey is out of range. HOWEVER, those cheap refractometers with the sugar scale suitable for honey are just fine. I bought a cheap one (about $50, made in china) a few years ago and it is just fine. They are fast and easy to use and best of all, as far as I can tell, accurate.
     
  18. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Oh, no worries Ef. If I'm going to spend $50, I might as well spend a little extra and get one like Iddee linked.
     
  19. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I do but most (hobbiests) probably don't. You are probably just fine Crazy8, I didn't mean to cause undo angst. :oops:
    The one Iddee mentioned is a very reasonable price but only go that route if you are selling lots.
     
  20. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Perry, at that price, it is worth it for the education. Even hobbyists should know what one is and how to use it.

    PS. If any of you get one of these, please tell Bluesky you came to them through this site. In fact, you can click on their ad in the side panel and you are there. Check out other items while you are there. They seem to be a nice group of folks.