Too much pollen?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Eddy Honey, Apr 12, 2012.

  1. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    On one of my big hives that just reared a queen I notice that most the frames are mixed with nectar and pollen in no certain order. The honey flow is going to start back up as the temps get back into the 70's and 80's here and things are going to bloom even more. The walnut trees and several other trees (white blooms) are almost ready.

    Can there be too much pollen?

    Since they had the majority of their 1 deep and 3 mediums full of nectar and pollen I went ahead and added a second deep under the mediums but on top of the original deep. I moved some drawn frames up into the new deep.

    I was hoping to get some honey from this hive.
     
  2. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    yes..

    pollen can congest the primary brood nest in a way that can be (often is here) worse than nectar. frames with some pollen and some nectar are not such a large problem but solid frames of pollen needs to be moved to the outsides edges (out or up) of the primary brood nest. adding comb or foundation above a pollen bound hive will not remedy this problem.
     

  3. vermillion

    vermillion New Member

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    I feel I need to check mine for this too.....thanks for starting this thread.
     
  4. Joseph Clemens

    Joseph Clemens New Member

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    I used to think that "pollen bound" was a problem, but though many of my hives regularly fill many combs in the brood nest with pollen, I've never yet seen it develop into a recognizable problem. What I have seen is how quickly combs of pollen can be turned into combs of brood.

    Maybe "pollen bound" can be a problem - I once thought I knew better than the bees and began getting anxious whenever I saw them filling the brood nest with combs of pollen, and saw them filling combs of sealed brood with pollen as soon as the brood emerged. But nothing averse ever came of it, so now I smile :smile: and enjoy the pretty colored pollen cells.
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    One time pollen will FOR SURE cause a problem is in early spring when the queen is laying on 2 or 3 frames. If they fill the next 2 frames with solid pollen, she will not cross it to lay in more frames. You will have a 2 or 3 frame brood chamber until well into the honey flow.
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I would guess this 'problem' is location specific which is to say there are other places I have kept bees and never seen the problem. Here is different in that we can get a great quantity of pollen coming in and some hives do just exactly as Iddee states. The typical lower brood nest is two or three frames of brood closed in by two frames of solid pollen and everything to the outside of the pollen is totally unused. left to itself this pretty much leads to a brood nest right up thru the center of the stack... often two or three frames all the way to the top at the outsides of the boxes is also unused. The solid pollen frame is also great for queen starting purposes.