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After tirelessly building hundreds of top bar hives and Warre hives in my shop with a table saw and a miter saw, in conjunction with any friends I could con into helping, I finally have a mill producing all of my hives.

Here are some rough photos (we'll have professional photos taken in the next couple weeks) of the new horizontal top bar hives and Warre hives I'm both using in my own apiary and selling online through my store. They are both constructed from 1" FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) Certified Western Red Cedar. Both hives are precision milled just south of Portland, Oregon.

Top Bar Hive Front:


As you can see, they have 2 side entrances toward each end and 2 centered. I've found this allows for the most versatility in placement of the colony(s) when making use of a two follower board system. I generally start all of our colonies in one end surrounded by two followers. I then move one follower all the way to the other end and then begin harvesting.

Top Bar Hive Back:


Top Bar Hive Top:


Top Bar Hive Top Open:


The most annoying part to design, but I'm very pleased with the results. The "hinged" design is my favorite part.

Top Bar Hive 1 Piece Bars:


1 piece wedge top bars were the hardest part for us to make, but they are one of the easiest components for the mill to produce. Using their CNC equipment they pump out dozens per minute.

Warre Hive Front:


Warre Hive Side:


Warre Hive 1 Piece Bars:


Hopefully these photos are helpful to someone!

Cheers,
Matt
 

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I was just thinking with all of the nice wood grain those would look nice with some poly on them. Really be a little show piece in the back yard.
 

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might I suggest??? a cold dipping (well actually cold is not the right word here) with just a bit of exterior stain, a lot of paint thinner and just a bit of parafin can look awfully nice.

thanks for sharing the pictures.
 

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A little advice from a long-time architectural woodworker - use the finishes that boat builders use. My favorite is a penetrating oil from Sikkens called Cetol. Check out Jamestown Distributors for Sikkens and other extreme environment finishes. The enemy of finishes outdoors is the sun. It will fade stains, degrade clear coats and ultimately attack the wood itself. Oil finishes can be renewed by reapplying the oil. Film finishes - all varnishes, shellac, etc - must be removed and then reapplied to keep the work looking good. UV resistance is of prime importance. Having said all this, the best protection for wood outside is a pigmented paint, the more pigment the better. That western cedar sure would look nice with a clear finish, though.
 
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