Tractor recommendations

Discussion in 'The Rural Life' started by Tyro, Jun 5, 2011.

  1. Tyro

    Tyro Member

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    My family *might* be on the verge of purchasing a 40 acre farm south of us to move into - as a result, I have been thinking a lot about tractors. Unfortunately - I don't know the first thing about tractors!

    We would need one for jobs like mowing and brush hogging - perhaps a post hole auger, maybe snow 'moving' in the winter, etc. I am thinking something used on the order of a Ford 8N or so (not too big but with a pt).

    Does anyone have any suggestions/recommendations. Please also include what you would expect to PAY for the tractor as well!

    thanks

    Mike
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Those old 8N or even 9N's were great machines. There are a lot of them for sale up here and they fetch a decent price. A lot of guys are into restoring them as well. A good one (not needing anything drastic done to it) up here will fetch $2,000. (Canadian $)
    I envy you with the possible farm purchase, wish it were us.
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    DO NOT try to use an auger without a live PTO. An 8N does NOT have a live PTO. The brush hog can be used if you put a slip clutch on the PTO output shaft. The 8N is a great little tractor, but is a total pain when a live PTO is needed. An MF-35 or similar will do it all for around $3000.00
     
  4. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    It depends alot on how deep your pockets are :confused: You have to be careful about buying other peoples problems (been there done that). I see in several small town newspapers that you can buy a New 30 hp. or 35 hp. tractor with a loader and brush cutter fore under $10,000.00. Knowing what i know now i would have went with the new in a heart beat. The loader itself will add years to your life and Back. You can give 2,000.00 to $3,000.00 for a used tractor and if you have to buy new tires or have a motor, transmission, or hydraulic, repair you can add another two or three thousand dollars real quick and still have an old tractor (probably without live power) and still have to buy a brushcutter. What ever you do check it out good or find someone that knows about tractors to help you. Just my two cents worth. Jack
     
  5. Murrell

    Murrell New Member

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    I agree very much, as a former new/used tractor dealer, we would have a old 8N or 9N or even a 2N, people would say " I want one of those, why my grandpaw had one and he used it and used it "

    I always wanted to say " Yeah he used it and used it till it was wore out, then traded for something much better, since that time, it has gone thru 4-5 patcher/painter, back yard fixer uppers "

    Setting along side would be a similar sized overhead valve MF 30 for less money and it would go unnoticed !

    Oh, that was over 13 years ago !

    Murrell

    Believe me Used Car Dealers aren't the only shysters selling things !
     
  6. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    All of the above is exactly what you are looking for. Live power, a set of remote hydraulics, power steering, canopy, front end loader, good tires, make sure you look over the front end for welds and/or cracks. If you buy used from a dealer ask them to hook the dyno up to it if they have one, this will tell you bunches about the motor and clutch real quick. Check the brakes, they are independent and if you are in gravel when you apply each side it should lock up and spin you around. Sloppy or slack in the steering, worn out joints and/or bushings. If it has a set of remote hydraulics ask to hook them up to something heavy and make sure both sides work (power up and power down). Hook something up to the pto to make sure the clutch is in good shape and not slipping (independent pto is even better). Hook something heavy up to the 3 point hitch and make sure it will lift it up and hold it up. Does the electrical work on the tractor, lights, charging system, flashers, glow plugs, etc. If diesel does it start right up, and before trying to start it feel of the block to make sure it is cold (was looking at a tractor and went there twice to see it, both times the tractor had been brought up to operating temp before I had gotten there and it started right up, could not tell how it started cold, I passed on it). Service records, previous owners, etc. Does the tach and hour meter work, if not how would you know how many hours are on this tractor, you don't. Look at the filters for dates and hours, then look at the hour meter and what is the date now, will give you a rough idea of how much it was used in the last filter change time frame. Check the front of the radiator for damage from sticks poking holes in it. If the rear tires are loaded or have been (have liquid ballast in them) check the rims extra good for rust and corrosion.


    If you can't get the price where you want it see if they will deliver for free.

    You can buy a bigger tractor for about the same amount of money as a smaller tractor because everybody wants a small tractor and bushhog. I am not a fan of the compact tractors at all (they might have the horse power but they are lacking in the weight), they are too light to do much with and I think you will be dissatisfied after the first year of use.