Treated with Formic Acid (Mite-a-way Strips)

Discussion in 'Pests and Diseases' started by The Bee Guy, Sep 26, 2013.

  1. The Bee Guy

    The Bee Guy New Member

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    I did a sugar roll test in August and had mite counts in the teens.
    I started treating my hives on September 24th.
    Here is a picture of one of my hives a day after treating with Formic Acid. bees after Formic Acid.jpg
     
  2. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    What temperature are you experiencing and you installed the package strips across the frames between the 2 brood supers? and you used 2 strips also. Just looked it up at 3 pm 86 deg F with humidity at 46% the feels like temp is 97 Deg F. I think the bees would be bearding out side the hive even if you hadn't treated them. sup-post to be cooler the next few days so should improve.
     

  3. The Bee Guy

    The Bee Guy New Member

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    I agree except the only hives that are bearding are the ones I treated.
    I treated 5 more today and fixing to treat 1 more before dark.
    I've still got 20 more to treat and am going to wait until Monday since we have a cold front due through here Sunday.
    Right now I've got 84 degrees F and the humidity is 56%.
    I have one of those Davis digital weather stations here.
    Oh well it gives me something else to look at. lol
     
  4. DLMKA

    DLMKA New Member

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    you'd go outside too if someone put acid in your house!
    Out bee inspector said MAQS are very hard on queens, says he see lots of hives with missing queens after a formic acid treatment.
     
  5. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I did almost all my hives with MAQS. I had 2 that were in the process of rearing new queens when I treated, and they did in fact fail. I only had 2 others that had queens go missing, and considering that I do not requeen as a habit, allowing the bees to requeen themselves when they see fit, I consider that for the most part successful. Those 2 missing queens may well just have been a coincidence with treatment and supercedure both occurring at the same time. Some of my queens are in their third year.
     
  6. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    I lost 2 or 3 queens as well out of 14 hives treated.
    I did MAQS in mid August during a cool snap.
    The bees have rebounded nicely and really packed away the goldenrod/knotweed/aster flow.
    I actually added another honey super 2 days ago to one of my 3 deep hives as they have their 3rd deep packed with capped honey along with a medium on top of that partially capped. These medium frames will go to some light nucs and 1 deep hives that got off to a later start.
     
  7. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    bee guy,
    i don't treat my bees anymore, and haven't for a number of years. with that said, in my humble opinion, anything we use to treat mites with has the potential to send the bees out the front door and bearding, and in my humble opinion, if we all read the fine print or do a little digging on anything used to treat mites with has the potential to affect the queen, and also brood rearing.

    ps although not very pleasant under the circumstances, (bearding hive escaping fumed living quarters) enjoyed your picture of the bearding hive. :grin:
     
  8. Larus

    Larus New Member

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    I have a couple of questions on the proper use of MAQS. About 5 weeks ago (5/31/14) I treated a hive with MAQS for the first time in my experience. I did read the instructions, but I wonder if there was something I missed.
    - The strips (i.e. the formic acid - drenched yellow sponge-like material) came sandwiched between two pieces of paper, and then wrapped in plastic. I took off the plastic wrap and put the strips in the hive, between the brood boxes, with the pieces of paper still on. The instructions also said, I believe, that there was no need to remove the strips after the treatment is done. I assumed the bees would just chew them up and carry them out of the hive eventually.
    However, when I inspected the brood chambers a month later, I saw that the bees have not done much to remove the paper or the strip material - it was all still there, sticking to the bottom of the frames above it, and turning black with age. The hive seemed to be doing all right (tight brood pattern, good activity, abundant honey stores (to the point of being somewhat honey-bound), but there were still some mites present in capped drone cells that I gouged open.
    So, my questions are:
    - Should I re-apply another round of MAQS right away (today's date is July 5th, 2014) or wait a couple of weeks so that I treat the brood that will become the bees that go into winter?
    - When putting the MAQS strips onto the top bars, should I remove the paper that the strip is sandwiched between?
    - Despite the instructions on the package, should I come back a week later and remove the strips?

    Thanks a lot.