Tree hive trapping

Discussion in 'Swarms, Cut outs, and Trap outs' started by melrose, Mar 13, 2012.

  1. melrose

    melrose New Member

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    A friend just contacted me. They had an old elm cut down last Wed. When they got home from work, bees were everywhere. Apparently hived up in the tree. She felt bad and wanted me to try to save those still lingering.
    Husband says only half the swarming are there now, maybe they've settled back into their home.
    My plan is to carry a deep or two with drawn comb/honey and lure scent out to their place. Hopefully draw the bees into a better home.

    Will this work? Am I going to have to go in after the queen?
    I have no brood... lost my hives over winter...

    Do I need a one-way door at their entry to make them seek residence in my box?

    Any help would be appreciated.
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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  3. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    You have two options that I see............

    #1 cut them out like Iddee shows in the pics he linked you to.

    #2 if you can cut the log and get it stood up the same way it was originally, cover the bottom with some plywood and cover the top with some plywood. On the top piece of plywood cut a hole in it, say two to three inches (I like to use hole saws myself) and then place a brood box on the top of it hoping the bees will move up into the new box. Be sure to give them an entrance close to the bottom of the log, you could even leave the bottom piece of plywood off.
     
  4. melrose

    melrose New Member

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    Went up to assess the situation last evening, turns out that the hive is located in a big limb. Unfortunately the limb ripped apart when they felled the tree. Several rows of old comb are exposed, a few dead bees, only found two live bees when I removed some comb pieces. The exposed comb is empty. I couldn't find any comb filled with honey, pollen, brood etc. Maybe they're deeper in the limb. In the afternoon, the owner did see a few buzzing around but not like the initial disturbance. I couldn't upright the limb as it was too big. Since the limb is ripped open I can't form a one-way that's not less than 4-5 feet. I'm going to take a box up this afternoon, temps are only going to get to 55, with night time temps still in the low 30s, these guys don't have much protection right now. Hopefully the queen will come along with the rest,

    It's been a week since the tree was cut, what are the chances that the colony(majority) has fled. They wouldn't leave with their queen I suspect. Hopefully she wasn't damaged when the tree fell apart.
     
  5. melrose

    melrose New Member

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    OK, 13 days past, we went out last week, saw some activity at the box that we set out, but also noticed alot of was crumbs on the bottom of the box. We saw no guards, no fanning etc., just bees coming and going, flying a beeline into the nearby woods.
    Tonight, weather permitting I'm going back over to remove the box, I figure it's probably empty, all the traffic that I saw was robbing in progress.
    The tree still has alot of comb inside, would it be a good idea to try and salvage as much as I can of the old comb? Maybe clean it, freeze it and use it in traps?
    Temps are in the 30s this week, hard freeze last night, any swarms that happened in the past week or so hopefully will survive.