Truth or myth

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by alleyyooper, Sep 15, 2009.

  1. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    A old bee keeper told me once that the rain washed the nectar from flowers, he said also that it took 3 days to get the nectar back to useable????


    What say you??

    would a heavy dew affect a flower thesame way?

    :mrgreen: al
     
  2. jdpro5010

    jdpro5010 New Member

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    I have been told the same thing about the rain and time till new nectar.
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    there is a bit of truth in every myth, otherwise the myth would not be so believable.

    I say maybe yes and maybe no.... which is to say I suspect this addage is quite correct for some plants. for other's perhaps not.... based upon watching the girls fly and returning with pollen after a rain. but who's to say the girls aren't just out hussling up some pollen after a rain without any nectar incentive?

    would the primary bloom in question be alfalfa or clover?
     
  4. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    Three days!!! :shock:

    I'll go with myth since it was one of the two options to select. But may I offer a third, called B.S.! :eek:

    Whether it be goldenrod or most other flowering plants, the individual flowers last only a few days. But on the stem, there may be multiple flowers opening up at staggered times, making it appear that the flower is around longer than what the individual flowers actually are. Not many flower types last long enough to be producing nectar, get a days rain, then wait a full 3 days to recover to produce nectar again for another several days.

    Other flowers like dandelions, close up completely when the sun is not shining. And come back out as soon as the sun shines again.

    Nature designs many things in ways that do not waste, does not allow for such interruptions, etc. You would think in some parts of the country, with almost daily afternoon rain showers, that every bug, bee, and insect out there would of been dead long ago with some 3 day rule. ;)
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Like Tec said, and Bjorn re-enforced, nothing in nature is black or white. Everything will vary with different species and climates. There are areas where the local flowers only bloom one day and that is the first sunny day after a rain. They produce abundant dessert honey.

    One of my favorite sayings is....... You can make any statement about honeybees and they will prove you wrong on the next visit to the beeyard.

    PS... Glad to see you on board. Welcome.
     
  6. scdw43

    scdw43 New Member

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    I have been told if it rains at night, it will not affect the flow, but if it rains during the day that it will. I watched the bess in one yard after a 4" rain one night. The next morning they did not hesitate to leave the hive early, the poplar was blooming.
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    beyond the myth or truth of the statement alleyooper I think it is important for all new beekeeper to come to understanding that just because you see bloom doesn't necessarily correspond to a nectar flow. as iddee and 'the unmentionable one' suggest there is great variation in the nature of flowering plants themselves and a host of variable somewhat to highly determines when they secrete nectar (of course some do not and other are unavailable for the honeybees). the only reasonable way to know whether nectar is coming in the front door is 1) have a hive on a permanent scale so weight can be monitored or 2) see how much 'splash' may bumbed from a frame. everything else is pretty much conjecture and 'could be'.
     
  8. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    I also think it depends on the flower. Things like cone flowers (the classic picture of a honey bee) I beleive could wash off the nectar during a rain storm, I also think that same flower could have dulated nectar so not as use full to the girls. A trump vine flower on the other hand I find hard to beleive that the nectar could wash out. They tend to droop so the insides for the most part can't get wet inside by falling rain.

    Happy to see nobody linked me to bee sore or bee master for the answer.

    :mrgreen: Al
     
  9. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    ;)

    Al,
    I had to think about that for a moment. But then I realized it made more sense than anything else....and how true.... :lol:
     
  10. rast

    rast New Member

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    This I do know, a rain storm and hard wind will destroy the orange bloom. The fruit will still form, but the bees will bounce from bud to bud.
     
  11. indypartridge

    indypartridge New Member

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    I've heard oldtimers say the same thing about rain and nectar, but it's usually been when talking about the locust bloom in the spring. Around here, it's usually a short, intense bloom - maybe a week - and they say if it rains every other day they'll be no locust honey.
     
  12. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    But is that due to no nectar being produced, or the bees eating the stores brought in from the day prior, during a spring buildup that seems to utilize a lot of stores.

    I would imagine that rain every other day during any blooming period would result in no "honey". But that is not the same thing as no "nectar".

    It could be that during the locust bloom, collection time is cut in half, thus limiting the storing of excess, and the eating away of what they bring in.

    I've seen bees bring in pollen almost all season long within an hour of rain. Which would indicate to me that many types of flowers do not get "washed" as much as we might think. If the pollen is still good, the nectar would be also.