Trying my hand at a trap out

Discussion in 'Swarms, Cut outs, and Trap outs' started by AcmeBees, Jun 10, 2012.

  1. AcmeBees

    AcmeBees New Member

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  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Good looking trap-out. Cone is a bit long but don't think it will be a problem. Any chance you could replace that entrance reducer with one that opens on the side nearest the base of the cone? It might make it easier to lure the bees into the box, that said they will use the middle quite readily as already seen in the vid.
    I wouldn't have known this was your first crack at it, nice tidy job! :thumbsup:
     

  3. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Nice job! Iddee makes those cones look easy to make. I wrestled with my first two or so and pricked my fingers countless times by the cut cloth....keep us informed....
     
  4. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Looking good!!

    Like Perry I would make the entrance hole as close to the wall as possible.

    For making the cones, when you first start to roll them up I use a paper stapler to temporarily hold them together. Roll the cone up and make the small end closed up, after you get it put together then take some tin snips and cut open the small end escape hole to the size you want. I like to use wire to sew up the edges of my cones, takes a little time but they work out very nice. Last one I made the whole side had to be cut out to fit on the side of a log cabin, held it in place with silicone, worked out really well.
     
  5. AcmeBees

    AcmeBees New Member

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    Update time day 11, first time back. My daughter is getting married in Feb, and it was meet the fiance's parents weekend with a picnic at my home, plus work, so I have neglected the start of this thing a bit.

    Any how, the trap hive started with one side of a frame of eggs and another side with pupae, with bees to cover the brood.

    Found about 4 to 5 frames worth of bees, various stages of drawn comb on the foundation frames that surrounded the original frame of eggs.

    AND..........drum roll please.........6 beautiful capped queen cells!! woohoo!!

    One drawback, there we're a few bees finding there way back behind that comprimised band board. I stuffed it shut with plastic bags that I had with me. (I forgot my caulking gun) I'll follow up Sunday with a proper gluing and inspection again.

    So day 11, minus a couple days for the bee leak. So far so good. Maybe a video on Sunday. Who knows....I'll let the spirit guide me.

    Thanks for the support.
     
  6. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Sunday is the day the queen emerges. Only work on the leak Sunday, don't open the hive for a minimum 6 days from Sunday. The new queen may be killed if you disturb them now.

    PS. Beautiful job. Congrats.
     
  7. AcmeBees

    AcmeBees New Member

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    I received a call from the homeowner yesterday. She stated that the bees we're "swarming". I tried to get a description of what was going on, but am unsure as to exactly what went on.

    I am fairly certain the queens hatched, and this caused the event reported to me.

    My question is, what are the different scenarios of what is happening?

    My intuition says it was a virgin queen absconding with some of the bees.

    Any ideas? as Iddee says in the above post, I will not go into the bait hive for a week. I think this is because I should not disturb them while accepting and mating the new queen??

    Thanks
     
  8. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    There is really no telling what the home owner is seeing, could be anything from bees leaving the cone to the virgin queen going on her mating flight to bees pollinating flowers.

    You definitely have a hatched queen by now, if not you will not have one unless you add another frame of eggs to the bait hive.

    I really don't think you are seeing a virgin queen absconding with a swarm, the workers are not in swarm mode.

    I would give them a few more days before digging into the hive, some how the workers think it is the fault of the new queen they are being molested and will ball her (or at least that is my take on it).
     
  9. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Whatever the owner seen doesn't matter. The queen will still need peace and quiet for a week or two. Could have been an orientation flight or swarm from the house, a busy day in the field, any number of things. None of which would change the plans for the trapout.
     
  10. AcmeBees

    AcmeBees New Member

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    Due to work schedule and weather this trap had been neglected the last couple weeks. I finally got over to look. No activity coming from the cone, but the bait hive is queenless. I saw what looked like pupae in some of the honey and 3 or 4 frames had about a 3 inch circle of capped drone brood. So, I've got a laying worker don't I? My initial thought was to get one of my smaller colonies and combine with the queenless. My fear would be the laying workers could kill the queen of the good colony. So, I opted to remove the trap cone and swap my small good colony with the queenless to do the clean out duties. I then brought the queenless home, so I could keep an eye on it. I have another colony that has hung some swarm cells. I shook the bees off the frame with the swarm cells and put that in the queenless colony. What's the chances of that sticking? Or is this laying worker thing a lost cause?
     
  11. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    If you gently brushed the bees off, your chances are good.

    If you shook the queen cells hard enough to get the bees off the frame, you likely damaged or killed the unborn queens.
     
  12. AcmeBees

    AcmeBees New Member

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    aaarrrrggg.......I gave the frame one good shake to get the majority off so I could be sure the other queen was not present.

    I am going to give it a few days. I have my hives up pretty high, because I'm a large mammal, with the screen bottom board I can lay down and look up at the queen cells. If they do not open in the timeline, a guess that plan is SOL.

    So, frame of eggs from somewhere, and maybe another frame of brood? shake the whole thing out and store the equipment?
     
  13. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    the 1st 1 is always the hardest and after that its not too bad, Ive done 18 removals/trapouts this past year, every 1 has it own problems and solutions,maybe next time you are going to start a trap out take a frame of eggs and 1 of food and start a nuc ahead of time so you can just add the 2 frames with capped cells at the start of the trap out, for me I find taking a weak nuc with a laying queen works best for a trap out cause in a few weeks I have a strong hive.
     
  14. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    I had to cringe when you said you shook the frame with queen cells.

    Like Zookeep said, I find that making up a one or two frame nuc ahead of time or a weak hive with a laying queen seems to work the best for a trap out.
     
  15. AcmeBees

    AcmeBees New Member

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    Checked what I thought was the laying worker colony, I've got brood and lots of it.

    I was really down on myself about this thing, but it looks like they are pulling themselves out of the gutter.

    Thanks to all for the advice