Two African queens!

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Kevin, Nov 12, 2012.

  1. Kevin

    Kevin New Member

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    Before joining my two new swarms with my queen less hives I had a good look for the queens, Im so happy I spotted them.
    Took a couple of pics, I present you with my two African Queens! Queen 1.jpg Queen 2.jpg
     
  2. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    reels great when something like that happens:thumbsup:
     

  3. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Nice pics. :thumbsup:
    In the first pic I thought I saw a mite on the queen but I believe that is just where her wing meets her body. In the second photo, the bee in the very left bottom corner definitely has a mite on it. Just something to keep an eye on.
     
  4. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I don't remember for sure, but didn't someone mention leaving them alone for a week, then checking again?
     
  6. Lburou

    Lburou Member

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    So, do you have time on your hands, or, do mites just jump out at your brain? ;)
     
  7. Kevin

    Kevin New Member

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    Mite???? What do I do?

    Iddee, they did but I'm not going to be around for 2 weeks and thought doing it earlier would be better than later....btw, how long will they take to get through the newspaper, I made holes with a fork.
     
  8. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    With just one sheet of newspaper and a few holes in it, give them a couple of days. Did you allow both nest an entrance? If not it can get pretty hot on the hive that has no ventilation.
     
  9. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    beautiful queens kevin.
    the mites, as perry said, something to keep an eye on, there are a number of ways to determine your mite load in a hive, but for now, i would let these hives adjust. it won't take them long to get through the newspaper, within a few days, or less. and as iddee said, now i would really let them alone and not be poking around in there for at least another week, because of the combine and new queen, sort of let everyone 'get acquainted'. :grin:
     
  10. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    :oops: Sorry, just observing (and I do have way too much time on my hands, especially this time of year).:lol:

    Kevin, 1 mite seen does not indicate any measures should be taken at this point, just something to keep in mind. Once you have your hives settled in, then you can perhaps do an accurate mite count and see whether any action is required.
     
  11. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Kevin, most people do monitor mite numbers in their hives routinely, I am not one of those. ;) All swarms are likely to have at least a few hitch hiking mites along for the ride, don't let it worry you too much- there are probably mites in your hives anyway. Few hives have no mites at all.
     
  12. guyross2

    guyross2 New Member

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    I watched one day as my mentor removed a mite from a worker with a small knife. There didn't appear to be any damage done to either the bee or mite.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
     
  13. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I would GUESS guyross that the mite in question was just moving around and not attached directly to the bee. they have a name for the mite at this stage of their development but at the time I cannot not recall the exact word????? blame this on either old timers disease or an overloaded cpu.
     
  14. guyross2

    guyross2 New Member

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    So you mite was taking a ride to the hive to lay eggs that would hatch and attach to the bees still in the pupa stage. I hope you don't really have old timers. You probably just have sectors of your hard disk that are no longer accessible.
     
  15. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Good catch on the mite Perry the African bee can tolerate the mites better cause of the worker bee emerges one day quicker than the European bees do. so there is only one new mite that has a chance to mature. because they swarm and abscond they are causing brood breaks naturally. When a feral colony sets up a new hive and the bees start building comb they build worker comb first which forces the mite to lay in worker comb cause no drone cells are available to them.
     
  16. Lburou

    Lburou Member

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    Tecumseh, the word might be phoretic. As in phoretic mites. Maybe ectoparasite...? :)
     
  17. DonMcJr

    DonMcJr New Member

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    Isn't African bees like a bad thing?
     
  18. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Depends on your point of view, where you live, and what works best in your situation.
    Not if they are the only race to survive in an area. Years ago when John Corner (Head of the B.C. apiary branch) worked at setting up manageable apiary programs in Kenya and Ugandan the talked about the program the hurdles the beekeepers faced. The African governments forbid the importation of European honey bees to protect the native spices that thrived in that hostile environment. He had a news paper clipping of two nuns being sent to jail for trying to smuggle bees into the country under their gowns.
    Back in 1956 when African bees were brought to Brazil for the breading program and experiment, the escaping of swarms was considered a mistake and disaster by most people. But the European bees preformed poorly in the tropical rain forest regions and the African bees thrived providing the beekeepers in the region a better crop and higher income. Yes it required protective equipment to work the hives and the hives had to be placed away from humans and animals. The research into finding drugs and cures for the bee mites didn't start in ernest till the mites were discovered in bees in the USA. By this time the European bees in the tropical region were being decimated my the mites, where the African bees that can tolerate the mites survived providing bees for pollination and bees for beekeepers to maintain their way of life.
     
  19. DonMcJr

    DonMcJr New Member

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    Interesting thanks for the info...