Two Queen System

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by barry42001, Dec 14, 2009.

  1. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    I am thinking about trying to use a system that uses 2 queens in same colony, makes sense, and if all goes well can triple honey production but is somewhat labor intensive so here goes_
    Take a standard two bfrood chamber with brood in each section, find the existing queen and set that brood chamber back on the bottom board, place a queen excluder on top then the next brood chamber, next introduce a new queen to the upper brood chamber, above the queen chamber. After a few days the queen in upper chamber will be laying eggs. Add new brood chamber to upper and lower sections. Again ensure that the two queens stay seperated by excluder. The resulting explosion of worker population if properly timed will dramatically increase the foragers and intake of nectar. At end of honey flow, seperate the two brood chambers, and place upper chambers on own bottom board, will experience a loss of older workers back to old hive location, but new bees will take their place now have two well populated hives, with ample workers to gather fall flows for wintering. Again know is a bit labor intensive but am thinking about it. Any thoughts. :thumbsup:
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    The queens will fight through the excluder.

    Set the two chambers side by side, put excluders on both, set honey supers in the center, covering half of each. Cover the remaining halves with waterproof wooden cover. When finished, remove honey supers and excluders, put lids on each chamber.
     

  3. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    Managing Colonies for High-Honey Yields
    By: F.E. Moeller


    Two-Queen System
    The establishment of a two-queen colony is based on the harmonious existence of two queens in a colony unit. Any system that ensures egg production of two queens in a single colony for about 2 months before the honey flow will boost honey production (Moeller 1956).

    The population in a two-queen colony may be twice the population of a single-queen colony. Such a colony will produce more honey and produce it more efficiently than will two single-queen colonies. A two-queen colony usually enters winter with more pollen than a single-queen colony. As a result of this pollen reserve, the two-queen colony emerges in the spring with a larger population of young bees and is thus a more ideal unit for starting another two-queen system.

    To operate two-queen colonies, start with strong overwintered colonies. Build them to maximum strength in early spring. Obtain young queens about 2 months before the major honey flows start. When the queens arrive, temporarily divide the colony. Replace the old queen, most of the younger brood, and about half the population in the bottom section. Cover with an inner cover or a thin board and close the escape hole. The division containing most of the sealed and emerging brood, the new queen, and the rest of the population is placed above. The upper unit is provided with an exit hole for flight.

    At least two brood chambers must be used for the bottom queen and two for the top queen. Two weeks after the new queen's introduction, remove the division board and replace it with a queen excluder. The supering is double that required for a single-queen operation, or where three standard supers are needed for a single colony, six will be needed for a two-queen colony.

    When supering is required, larger populations in two-queen colonies require considerably more room at one time than is required for single-queen colonies. If a single-queen colony receives one super, a two-queen system may require two or even three empty supers at one time.

    The brood chambers should be reversed to allow normal upward expansion of the brood area about every 7 to 10 days until about 4 weeks before the expected end of the flow, after which the honey crop on the colony may be so heavy as to preclude any brood nest manipulations. There after, give supers as they are needed for storage of the crop. As the honey is extracted, the supers are returned to the hive to be refilled. They should never be replaced directly over the top brood nest, unless a second queen excluder is used to keep the queen out of them. The top brood nest may tend to become honey bound. If this occurs, reverse the upper and lower brood nests around the queen excluder. This puts the top honey-bound brood nest on the bottom board and the lighter brood nest with the old queen above the excluder.

    There is no advantage in having a second queen when about a month of honey flow remains, because eggs laid from this time on will not develop into foragers before the flow has ended. However, entering the brood nest during the middle of the flow to remove one of the queens is impractical. Uniting back to a single-queen status can be done after the bulk of the honey is removed from the colony. By this time some colonies may have already disposed of one queen. When this happens, simply remove the queen excluder and operate the colony as a single-queen unit.
    Thats where I got the information I do understand what your saying.
    also found exactly what your talking about. www.betterbee.com/resources/images/dronereport.pdf
     
  4. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    In beekeeping, there is never only one way. Sometimes there are better ways.
     
  6. rast

    rast New Member

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    Bjorn's is good as long as the hives stay in one place like his do.
     
  7. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    A little simple math.
    4 deeps=40 inches
    6 mediums=42 inches
    1 medium full of honey=60 lb.
    Lifting 60 lb. at 7 feet....... No thanks. I think I'll stay with the side by side.
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    might I suggest that some set ups work better in some places than in others. might I also suggest that some configuration will not work in SOME location at all.

    you might wish to first consider the 'kind of flow' that you might expect at your location. a two queen system was the choice of folks that produced comb honey and were typically situated in a place where the flow was constant and not punctuated.
     
  9. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    The side by side two queen system is excellent for anyone wanting to do drone trapping. ;)