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I'm lost when it comes to the foundations. No foundation, wax foundations and plastic foundations. To me right off that plastic isn't natural so leaning away from that. I've read that it is best to have no foundation in the brood but wax foundations in the supers. But, go to another website and they say something else.
 

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It comes down to personal preference, I prefer the crimped wire wax foundation using wedge top/divided bottom frames. I use these in all of my boxes, they usually draw it out quickly and as you stated its natural.
 

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This will be my third year keeping bees and there are a whole lot of experienced folks here with a wealth of knowledge, but I use wired wax foundation with support pins on the frames in my deep and medium boxes. My bees do just fine with that combination, but then again, I am not familiar with another method.
 

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I second the above, except I cross wire and embed the foundation. I highly recommend this way for your first year, then you can experiment with other ways after you have a bit of experience.
 

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I guess that makes me un-natural :mrgreen: .
I run wood frame but wax coated plastic foundation in both brood and honey supers.
I would agree with the idea of starting with wax and then trying something different (if you choose to) after a bit of experience. Slowmodem has as a tag line "everything I do at this point is an experiment," and those are sage words. Experiments are how discoveries are found. You will make some of your own.
You will find many different answers to the same question, (beeks are famous for that). Sift thru them and find the answers that fit in best for how YOU want to enjoy this addicti.....I mean hobby!
 

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Once you have a hive full of good straight drawn comb, you can then start experimenting with slipping in a foundationless frame (with wire or fishing line support lines) in between the fully drawn frames. That way they are sure to draw it straight. That's what' I've been doing, and I have lots of all natural brood frames now. Eventually my brood boxes will all be foundationless as I rotate in more and more. I do find the deep frames need some support wire- like a "X" of fishing line going across the frame. Once the brood comb is over a year old it hardens more and you have less danger from sagging, especially if temps stay below 95F. I started with wax/wire foundations in my deeps, now I can put in a foundationless and they always draw it straight because it's sandwiched between two already drawn combs- no place to go but straight down for them. :)
For mediums, I put just ONE frame with wax foundation in the middle (as a ladder for them to climb up) and the rest empty with popsicle stick guides. You have to watch them the first few weeks so they don't draw wild comb (just cut it out if they do and make them try again), but once they start drawing straight they'll keep drawing that super straight. I didn't need support wires on the medium frames since they are so much smaller than deeps.
I'm using the crush/strain method to harvest honey for now, so the pure comb with no foundation in the supers is nice to cut out and use as cut comb or crush and save the wax for candles. I'm small scale -just a handful of hives- so big guys can't really work this way. I can also see the advantage of just scraping the comb and honey off the plastic foundation in a super, but I'm just not into the idea of plastic foundation.
You'll find that the more drawn comb frames you accumulate, the more options you will have whenever you start a new hive, nuc, or box.
 

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I'm with iddee on this for new beekeepers. :thumbsup: I've had better luck with the wax foundation over the years, the bees will go right to work on it. When using plastic foundation (recycled milk jugs :mrgreen: ) i found that there has to be a honey flow going on or they will ignore it or only draw a parcel of it. If you mix wax foundation frames and plastic foundation (on wood frames) in the same box, it makes it worse, they will work the wax and most time not touch the plastic foundation. :confused: I was surprised that un- natural Perry used plastic foundation that far north, i've heard other beekeepers say plastic foundation makes the hive colder in the winter. Remember guy's i'm old so be nice. :lol: :lol: Jack
 

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brooksbeefarm said:
i've heard other beekeepers say plastic foundation makes the hive colder in the winter.
I can't imagine how someone would actually measure that. Sounds more like some geezer opinion to me.
 

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Omie said:
brooksbeefarm said:
i've heard other beekeepers say plastic foundation makes the hive colder in the winter.
I can't imagine how someone would actually measure that. Sounds more like some geezer opinion to me.
I can't see the image Omie, does it look anything like Jack? :eek:ldtimer: :lol: :mrgreen:
 

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I used wax foundation horizontally wired the first half of my beekeeping career.
For the last several years I have been using Pierco foundation. I have not had any problems with the bees drawing foundation. I do not put supers on until they need them though.
In Jamaica they cannot even import wax foundation or wax coated foundation. They either feed the bees light syrup or wait for a nectar flow.
 

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I guess I am also old school, wood frames with wax foundation and cross wired for me.

Only problem with wax foundation I have found was that if the bees run out of something to do (nothing to forage on) they will chew the wax foundation up to use it in other places in the hive.
 

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Iddee would never say no to my dear Omie. She can post whatever she wants. I just took it as a typo that was meant to be "imagine".
 

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Started with crimped wax foundation in cross wired frames. Looks great , but didn't like the fact that wax of unknown origin is in my hives. Started experimenting and following is what I prefer:
In brood boxes foundationles frames crossed with fishing line.
For honey supers nothing matches one piece plastic frames, bees draw it fast, and no blow outs while extracting.
 

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And where did the plastic come from? Was it always new, or may it be recycled bed pans? :twisted: :rolling: :rolling:
 

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If you think about it Iddee, are the keys on your keyboard you've just been typing on made of recycled................................? :twisted: :lol:
 

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Iddee being Iddee :lol: :lol:
Rather recycled bed pans then recycled AFB infected wax. :(
 

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I don't scrape food off my keyboard and eat or sell it. :p :p

Since I've never gotten AFB from foundation, I'll take that chance rather than bedpans, catheters, enema tubes, ETC. :eek: :eek: :lol:
 

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Iddee said:
I don't scrape food off my keyboard and eat or sell it. :p :p
Please don't tel me when bite of venison drops on your key board, you throw it in garbage :eek: :lol:
 
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