Unnerving Inspection...

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Cupcakus, Apr 6, 2014.

  1. Cupcakus

    Cupcakus New Member

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    I just inspected my hives this weekend, and one of them is having issues...

    When I removed the cover they sounded queenless, a lot of noise in there... when I separated the two deeps from each other I broke about 8 queen cups they had built between the deeps, some were never sealed, some had dead fully developed queens in them, some were pupae that fell out. When I removed the bottom deep there was a queen lying on the bottom board still alive but really lethargic, a couple workers were prodding her. I removed her from the hive. I didn't find a queen on any of the frames but I didn't really look very hard, they were really upset so I was working quickly.

    I don't have laying workers *yet* but it almost feels like they swarmed on me, and I just broke all the replacement queen cells. I have another healthy hive with eggs I could transplant into this hive, or should I wait and see if there's a good queen in there?
     
  2. camero7

    camero7 Member

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    A frame of eggs will not hurt, I'd put one in.
     

  3. Capt44

    Capt44 New Member

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    If you found a Queen in the bottom on it's last leg I would go to another hive and find a capped queen cell or at least a frame of eggs to put in the hive in dispare.
    The eggs will hatch in the next 24 hours and the larva will be prime for the workers and nurse bees to make a queen.
    I would inspect the Hive again to make sure you don't have a queen.
    I could be a queen emerged and fought the old queen.
    What you might have seen is one of the queens dying from the fight.
    If you have a virgin queen in the hive she may be hard to find for she's not filled out yet, still slim.
     
  4. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    I take the behaviour of the bees as a guide to whether the colony is queenlees. If the bees are bringing in stores and moving purposely over the comb then I would suspect they had a queen.

    Were there any worker larvae or sealed brood in the frames ? These would indicate a laying Q within recent weeks. The dead pupae in the Q cups would be from eggs laid within 10 days or less.

    One scenario that could fit your findings, would be ----- a failing Q, a batch of Q cells raised, a Q hatched that has gone round killing her sisters and is now hiding and maturing before going out on orientation and mating flights.

    I would tend to leave the colony alone for 10 days before another inspection.
     
  5. Cupcakus

    Cupcakus New Member

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    It turns out both hives are in the same state, no eggs, or larvae anywhere, most of the honey stores are gone. The bees behavior seems the same as it always does though, they even seemed less agitated than normal while I was working them. Normally they head butt my veil constantly and they mostly left me alone this time. I'll check them again next weekend and see if things are any different. It's two weeks before queens and packages become available out here so hopefully they can hold on.