Upper Entrance

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by arkiebee, May 30, 2010.

  1. arkiebee

    arkiebee New Member

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    I read a lot about upper entrances on the forum - can someone explain to me exactly how to fix an upper entrance? Where to put it? How big, etc? I have never used one on my hives. We have screened-bottom boards on all our hives, but it has been so hot & humid lately that the bees in the larger hives are really hanging outside a lot late evening and night. Right now I have a hive that looks like it's bearding and it's 9:00 pm here now.

    This hive has a queen excluder on it because yesterday I was finally able to get the super off the bottom that the queen laid in earlier in the year. I have 2 hive bodies, q.e., then the super the queen had laid in, and the honey super on top of that. (I made sure the queen is in the hive bodies) Is that an ok arrangement...for now anyway? I don't like to use queen excluders, I guess because I really don't understand how to "correctly" use them.
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Your use of the excluder in this case is just fine.

    I don't use top entrances, so can't help you there.
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    there are any number of ways of create upper entrances.

    1) you can slightly misalign (front and back) the upper boxes to create an upper entrance.

    2) you can obtain building shims (available in any building supply store) and insert two at the corners for a top entrance or at the top of the box.

    3) my upper entrances are built into my slightly modified migratory tops (essentially they have a rim built into them like an inner cover) and one side of the rim has a inch and a half gap.
     
  4. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    I usally cut the uper entrance in my intercover. Most times it is 3/8 inch high and 1 1/2 wide. I also drill 3/4 inch holes in the brood boxes. They can be easly closed with a small chunk of 3/4 inch dowel. the upper entrance if need be can be closed up with a bit of duck tape but i normally leave mine open year around only closeing them when moving or I sepect robbing attempts.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    :mrgreen: Al
     
  5. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    I bought these cool ventilated inner covers- I like them:
    [​IMG]
    My bees are loving both top and bottom entrances.
    Before this I chiseled a 1.5" entrance in my 'regular' inner covers.
     
  6. arkiebee

    arkiebee New Member

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    Omi - I really like those inner covers. I went to the website and it says we can downloand the plans. I am checking into that.

    Al - Do you leave those telescoping covers cocked like that all the time during the summer weather? This morning before school, I went out and put a couple of popsicle sticks on each end and propped my lids like you have in the photo to give them some air. It is to be in the 90s here today.
     
  7. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    Once day time temps get inb the 60F range and the nights are in the 45F range I cock the outercovers like that. Once the day time highs are in the 70F range and the nights still staying in the 45F and up range I remove the flashing from the bottom boards. I'll still get some bearding but nothing like I used to get.
    OH ! My intercovers have the slots cut across the frames too. I feel it allows better air ciruation thru the frames.

    flashing picture.
    [​IMG]

    I'll find the picture of the intercovers a bit latter. TRhundering here so is time to shut the putter down and unplug every thing. Yes we hav a surge protector but we also had one foir the last computer that got zapped.

    :mrgreen: Al
     
  8. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    You can see how the hole is in the intercovers in this picture.

    [​IMG]

    :mrgreen: Al
     
  9. sqkcrk

    sqkcrk New Member

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    Most of my equipment is in such a shape that the bees can find an upper entrance if they want one. I don't go out of my way to give them one, but if I have a super w/ a hole in it or a super w/ a broken rabbet I will face that towards the front of the hive.

    Some of the newly acquired supers have a hole drilled in them. apparently the previous owner liked giving the bees a choice about where to come and go from.
     
  10. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Those are not actually upper entrances, they are just ventilation holes, correct?....the bees cannot leave the hive as an upper entrance with them, right? (Unless you have additional entrances cut in the outer edge of the inner covers as well that are hard to see in the photo...)
     
  11. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    The picture of the upper entrances are the hive pictures. They can still come and go thru the cross cut vent hole if they wish since I prop the outercover when it is hot.

    :mrgreen: Al
     
  12. rast

    rast New Member

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    It doesn't matter what I do in the heat of the summer with a strong hive, upper entrances, they just beard out of them. Slat racks helped some, not worth it. It's their way of not overheating the inside of the hive. Whether I like it or not, they know more than I do about whats best for them most of the time. But, I still want to do what makes ME feel better.
     
  13. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    To me, bearding is a sign of a healthy hive. I like to see it.
     
  14. rast

    rast New Member

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    Iddee-"To me, bearding is a sign of a healthy hive. I like to see it"
    Me too.
     
  15. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    I pulled a slick one the other day with a nuc box. I was doing a trap out on a stucco building the hive was comming and going on the lower part of the second floor right next to the roof line of the porch. When doing a trap out you need to put the entrance to the bait hive as close to the original entrance as possible. The hole in the wall was right about the top of the nuc. I took the top and made it the bottom and the bottom board became the top. I then used a ratchet strap to hold the hive together and screwed the end of the strap to the window trim to hold the nuc in position worked great. As for regular hives I drill a 3/4 inch hole in the second deep just below the top cover. I also use slots in the inner cover all works good.
     
  16. sqkcrk

    sqkcrk New Member

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    If I am going to drill a hole in a super for bees to use, I like it to be below the hand hold so I don't get stung in the palm of my hand.