Beekeeping Forums banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone
I am new member and i come from Macedonia

I started beekeeping about a year ago and this year i am using the queen excluders for the first time, i installed them about 10 days ago but the bees have not started building or spreading in the upper part of the hive.

Any suggestion? Is this normal, how much time does it usually takes or i am doing something wrong?

Any advice is highly appreciated
Thanks in advance
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,487 Posts
if the upper box is simply foundation then it takes quite a while to get the girls to use this space. remedies may include placing one frame of drawn comb in the box to bait the girls up there and some small changes in the entrance situation. in the latter case an upper entrance should be almost a requirement and some reduction of the front entrance (essentially to force them to use the entrance above the excluder) are worthwhile small changes you may wish to consider. some folks simply place any new frames and foundation on the hive a couple of weeks early and when they see some activity in the newer box then they place on the excluder.

I hope that helps and good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,337 Posts
What Tec said.
Don't place excluder until bees are already working/building in the new super. Also, having an upper entrance at the top of the brood boxes or in the inner cover in addition to the bottom entrance helps encourage them to move through the supers. My bees have both entrances but always prefer using their top entrances in the inner cover. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,322 Posts
I have had quite a bit success by placing a few frames of emerging brood up in the new super. This will draw the girls up into the new super, place new bees where they will be needed most, relieve brood nest congestion with a excluder, and a upper entrance the girls then readily back fill the now empty frames with nectar and draw out the foundation.
Barry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,042 Posts
Welcome to the forum!

Last year was my first year in beekeeping as well.

What I did that seemed to work was to exclude the excluders.
I put the supers on without excluders and let the bees work them as they see fit.
Of course they put brood up there but my goal was for them to draw comb.
Once everything was drawn out to my satisfaction I put the queen excluders on below the honey supers to let all the brood hatch out and nomore eggs would be layed in the supers. Make sure the queen is below the excluder.
By that time, autumn was approaching so I took the supers off and stored them. In April of this year I had 10 fully drawn honey supers to put on above my queen excluders and the bees are filling them with honey.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
728 Posts
Welcome to the forum.

You will get good advice quickly. .:thumbsup:

If your supers are a different size to the brood or you do not wish to go into the brood, you may wish to try the following. On the 2 or 3 super frames above the centre of the brood nest, smear a little honey or syrup onto the foundation. This will encourage the bees to move up onto the super frames. .:idea:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the replies, i really appreciate it.
"exclude the excluders" i like the sound of that and i think ill give it a try and see how it goes.

Thanks again
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,487 Posts
a snip...
Last year was my first year in beekeeping as well.

What I did that seemed to work was to exclude the excluders.
I put the supers on without excluders and let the bees work them as they see fit.
Of course they put brood up there but my goal was for them to draw comb.

tecumseh:
for most very new beekeeper avoiding the excluder in year one to obtain the objective of getting as much comb drawn as possible is likely very good advice. with a bit more experience under you belt and enough comb drawn a queen excluder in years 2 and beyond does represent some advantages.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top