utilizing my deadouts

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by d.magnitude, Mar 17, 2011.

  1. d.magnitude

    d.magnitude New Member

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    Hi guys,
    As you may remember, I had a few deadouts over the winter (all my hives). I've ordered packages to install mid-to-late April, and I'm wondering how to best go about it and make full use of my resources.

    Essentially, each of my 3 hives was left w/ almost 10 deep frames of capped honey (Lots), and 10 deep frames of drawn empty comb. Five of those 10 frames are crap that came with my nucs that I want to replace, so I'm left with: 10 frames honey, 5 drawn empty frames, and 5 foundation per hive.

    How should I install my packages into this equipment and make best use of it? Just dump them right into the double deeps (and if so, just leave the honey all up top)? Even though there are lots of stores, should I feed a slow drip of 1:1 to encourage brood rearing in the beginning? Should I scratch the honey cappings to "get things moving" in there (I believe Tec recommending something along those lines once)?

    Thanks all. I'm trying to be optimistic this go 'round, and look at the resources I've got. I know they'll be "first-year bees", but I hope they'll have a jump-start with all the drawn comb.... Maybe there's finally some surplus in my future.
    -Dan
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    OPINION TIME...
    Here's mine.
    I would install them in empty box with 5 drawn combs, set the package cage where the foundation is going to be, to allow the bees to come out the top. Add the honey on top. Day 2, I would remove cage and install 5 foundation frames.
    Day 7, I would remove empty queen cage and inspect for eggs. As soon as I found eggs, I would close hive and wait another 7 days.
     

  3. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    Boy this ones going to get all kinds of opinions. Here goes mine I would hive the packages on 5 frames of empty drawn comb in the center with 2 frames of honey on each side on one side next to the empty comb I would have a frame of foundation. I would let them set for a day then make sure queen is released. once you got capped brood I would add the 2nd deep of foundation in the center and honey on the sides to them. bringing a frame of capped brood up in the top deep to bait them up and replacing that one with foundation in the bottom deep. then feed until both deeps are drawn. then let em go.
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    riverrat says:
    "Boy this ones going to get all kinds of opinions".
    :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
     
  5. d.magnitude

    d.magnitude New Member

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    Iddee- is there any disadvantage to putting that solid block of honey above the lower brood chamber? I don't want the queen to feel honey bound, when the honey stores might not usually be found until another "box" up, in a super.

    Does anyone think there is any advantage to scratching the cappings on the honey frames to entice them to draw more comb and/or amp up brood production? Or is this redundant if I should be feeding them 1:1?

    Thanks for all the replies so far. I already got a few "opinions" on this one at the bee club, so I didn't think there would be a shortage here. I certainly welcome more still.

    -Dan
     
  6. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    When you install them, they are going to the top, whether it be one, two, or 6 boxes. Then they will build a brood nest under the top. In this case, the honey super. A honey cap is when the honey is solid BETWEEN where the queen is and where you want her to climb to.IE: A honey cap in the bottom box on a two box brood chamber. Feed them until you put "YOUR" honey supers on.