Very frustrating?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by barry42001, Jun 17, 2012.

  1. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    I was inspecting my bees in Middleburg, one that was vandalized, but found and restored the Queen to them. They were starting to build up nicely from a package. As I went through the hive, noted a lack of eggs and small larvae but tons of sealed brood and more mature larvae. Thats when I found the supercedure cell, I had found the queen 2 weeks ago, on the face of a frame buisily laying eggs. Could not find her this time. I am considering allowing them to raise their own queen this time, the colony strength is far better now then before, they are still gathering nectar and pollen. and to a more limited degree still drawing comb, or repairing damaged comb from the truck thingy. Why now when things seem to be shaping up for them--this will set them back a bit I know so have to be prepared to feed them again...baffeling!
    Barry
     
  2. afterburn001

    afterburn001 New Member

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    It seems to go that way sometimes, huh? We just let one of our hives raise their own queen for the first time. We should know next week how good she is.
     

  3. jim314

    jim314 New Member

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    I'd let them raise their own. Out of 6 hives I've got one queen left that came from a commercial source. They have all done well raising their own queens. My topbar hive had a beeweaver package installed in April and swarmed in May. I hated losing the beeweaver queen, but her replacement was just as good. They swarmed again today :). Hoping the third queen is as good as the first two. I've had two beeweaver and one rweaver queens either superseded or left with swarms and thier replacements are doing fine. The 7th hive ( a last year swarm) went queenless this spring. I gave up giving them frames with eggs and larva after three frames. They will just die out.
     
  4. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    While I know are approaching or into a dearth seems maybe a inopportune time to break brood rearing and replace a queen, know that less brood consumes less groceries and a new young queen SHOULD raise a mountain of brood in late summer for the fall flow, and generate a decent to large cluster for overwintering and early spring build up.
    Barry
     
  5. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Had a hive that I found a virgin queen in on the 8th of June. It was small so I added a few frames of brood to give it a boost. Went in on the 16th to find it is completely plugged with honey and 2 seperate frames had a half dozen freshly capped supercedure cells on them. Figured oh well, split them up and set a new box on each half. Why they chose to give up on the queen they had I don't know (maybe cause they were honeybound?) We are in the midst of a huge blackberry bloom here.