Very new to Split's...so I have a few questions???

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Yote Shooter, Jun 20, 2013.

  1. Yote Shooter

    Yote Shooter New Member

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    On May 30th I extracted some honey and had a very strong hive so I made a split with some brood that had shown up in few frames of a deep that was high on the hive. I did not have any bees on these frames so I know that I did not have a queen. I pulled a few frames of brood and pollen and honey to have five frames and three empty foundation frames in a deep box. Of course I had bees on these frames but not the marked queen from the donor hive.
    On June 3 I checked the hive and admittedly may not have checked every frame but did not see any queen cells.
    So I again went into the donor hive and pulled a fresh frame with eggs.
    On the 9th I check and find 5 nearly full queen cells but not capped yet. I inspect again which I feel I was late, on the 16th. No signs of any queen cells. Plenty of drones. Totally cleaned up and I do not see a queen and don't see any eggs. 50 yrs old and eyes are going. So I was using reading glasses but did not see signs of a queen. Plenty of bees, I think!

    Purchase 2 queens today, 1 for my earlier post of weak nuc, and late this afternoon inspect with intentions of introduction cage. Looking around and LOTS of larvae. I see C's all over the frames. None capped. But I do not see the queen......

    So the questions are. Was there really enough time for a raised queen to mate and start laying?
    I felt like I had another week before ANY sign of eggs.
    This thick of coverage on frames would not be laying workers? And this question because confused as to the much higher then expected population, even though I had added the other brood frame I had not expected as many.
    I have seen what really appears to me as laying workers with very scattered capped slightly raised cells that are definitely not drone brood in other queenless hives.
    The ladies were very calm. I still have the entrance reducer on and when I closed it up they were very active at the entrance with raised fanning.
    Sorry I got so long with this! They really intrigue me!!!!
    I think with my new queen I will make another split.
    Tim
     
  2. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    Queens are raised form one or two day old larvae, but it takes the egg 3 days to hatch. So when you introduce a frame of eggs/larvae and they start on the queens, you're already on day 4 of the queen's life and just 12 days from emergence.

    Well, let's say that you missed the queen cells on June 3. Often they are all on just one frame (where the correct age larvae were). If they started those queens on June 1 with 3 day old larvae, they would have emerged on the 13th. A week after emerging the queen could be laying well. Likely the new queen did in the queen cells you saw on the 9th. As for your higher than expected population, one frame of brood will produce enough bees to cover two frames of comb.