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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I made a few walk away splits a couple of weeks ago letting the split raise its own queen i did them about 5 in the evening i split strong hives doing a 3 ways split to get my numbers up had some losses this spring. But i did one thing different i moved the original parent hive over about 6 foot then put the 2 splits from the parent hive that i had in a 5 on 5 configration side by side where the old hive was i put a frame of capped brood and a frame of eggs in each split. this was 2 weeks ago and all three hives are looking better than the hive that i left the parent hive in place. has anyone ever tried this
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
that be what i did the queen stays with the parent hive if i can find her i also make sure there is eggs in every hive. i dont recall ever reading this in any of the bee books but to me it makes since
 

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I like to move the old queen and leave the new stuff behind to catch the field bees. I don't generally do 'walk away splits' nor do I recommend this as an acceptable method for new beekeepers. In some places this 'bee hiver' solution to making increase or replacement may work quite well. Sadly in a lot of place the only thing this method will produce is a bad taste in your mouth.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I agree it is a method tht shouldnt bee tride by a newbee. I normaly dont do splits but after 5 years of keeping bees I am wanting to expand on the survivor bee stock that I have. i havent treated with anything and know i am wanting to continue the genetics
 

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When I make splits that are going to stay in the same yard I pull a few frames including the queen and place it right next to the donor hive. Quite a bit of drift goes to the queenright split and by the time it's all said and done they come out about equal.
 
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