wasp/hornet nest near hive?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by dominica, May 29, 2010.

  1. dominica

    dominica New Member

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    My hive is working, but I've discovered a large hornet nest underneath one of my awnings...I want to do away with it, and it is about 15 feet from the hive and, of course, much higher off the ground. If I spray this hornet nest with Raid, what are the chances of it harming the beehive or the bees?
     
  2. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

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    I don't know what the chances are, but we spray hornets and wasps if they are building on the house every time we see them. Our bees don't seem to be bothered by the spray at all.
     

  3. Bitty Bee

    Bitty Bee New Member

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    Chances are very little. We have a shed next to our bee yard and spray wasps and hornets in there all the time. As long as the spray doesn't get on the hive, on any flowers, or in water the bees might drink it should be fine.
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Use the wasp & hornet spray that directs a stream. Not the spray that mists a large area.
     
  5. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    Actually while hornets do occasionally take a few honeybees, they do take alot of etremely harmful insects , caterpillars, flies, beetles are thier primary diet, well actually the baby hornets ( larvae ), are on the protien diet, adults are surgar consumers. I never really had issues with hornets or yellowjackets, when I knew they were there, if they are a accidental discovery, well thats another issue and one learns quickly not to disturb them. The hornet colony in your awnings are not a issue to a strong colony. Now if your repainting your house --thats something different, I always used black flag wasp/ hornet killer--drops them now, no crawlers, and if you come at night like you should--will be no survivers, first hit the entrance and really lay it on to plug the only way out with dead hornets, then saturate the rest of the nest. If you do other then that, they can still get out and fly or crawl--neither is a pleasant option. But if at all possibly, let them clean your garden and immediate area of other pests, if they are not a threat--real threat--besides I studied hornets for awhile, they are truely remarkable insects learn form them they are as industrious as honeybee--just no honey.
    Barry
     
  6. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    If you just have to kill the wasp or hornets consider filling a hose end sprayer with dish soap from the dollar store then spraying the nest just at dark but still light enought to see what you are doing.
    It also works wonders in one of those pump up tank sprayers.

    :D Al
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    Al's the man.

    I myself prefer Ivory liquid dishwasher soap.
     
  8. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    Soap? How does that work?

    On wasps, I mean. I am familiar with the stuff, otherwise! :oops: :lol:
     
  9. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    it is my understanding Hobie that the soap spray closes off their trachael tubes and they suffocate.

    I suggest it to everyone that has problems with honeybees since it is not an insecticide... or at least it leaves no nasty residue that hangs around for years. It works on a wide array of insect beyond just honeybees.
     
  10. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    Yup I have used the method for years on wasp and hornets. Makes exllenant Yellow Jacket traps near the hives.
    I use milk jugs and water bottles, fill half way with soapy water(soap relives the tention of the water.). Drill a 3/8 inch hole near the top where you can reach it from the inside thru the neck. Remove the cap smear jelly jam (I use the packet stuff from restruants.) around the 3/8 inch hole and inside the cap, then set it out where you want to get rid of the yellow jackets. dump and reload about every two days. I set one on top of just about every hive if they are bad in the area.

    :mrgreen: Al
     
  11. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

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    I was meaning to ask and almost forgot..... do the traps for yellow jackets and hornets with the "lure" like you can buy at the hardware store trap the bees too, or are the bees totally uninterested in them?
     
  12. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    They'll trap some bees. What I prefer is to bait them with a little chunk of fish, that really attracts the yellow jackets well, but honey bees are totally not interrested.

    As for getting rid of the wasps/hornets, just knock down their nest and they'll leave instead of rebuilding it in the same place. Yellow jackets need to just die though.
     
  13. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

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    Thanks! I'll be giving that a try.
     
  14. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    You can use liver too. Get a pan about 4 inches deep make a tepee of sticks or a tripod if you like. Fill the dish nearly full of dishsoapy water to releve the tention. Hang a chunk of liver from the tripod. The yellow jackets being greedy and all get more than they can really carry so they fall into the soapy water and drown.
    You can clean out a nest of yellow jackets in short order with that method. You jst have to check the liver every day and be ready to put p with the stink if you don't change bait daily.

    :mrgreen: Al
     
  15. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

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    Thanks Al! Sounds like a good job for restless boys ;)
     
  16. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    yikes I got a wasp nest right at the front door of my honey house and one of the little nasties nailed me on the hand today. kinda hurts (whine, whine, whine). anyway I guess I will need to evict someone tomorrow.

    to add to your information mama beek in some place they have predatory type yellow jackets in large enough numbers that they can destroy beehives. not so long ago a Montana bee informed me that he had lost hives (in some small number) from what he call yellow jackets. I enjoyed reading of Al's trapping methods.
     
  17. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

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    Papa got stung on Friday by some sort of wasp or hornet.....maybe even a carpenter bee, all he knew for sure is that it wasn't a honeybee. Guessing from the size of the hole and the swelling I would say that we sure don't want whatever did that around here! I'll be putting out some traps and making sure that we have some spray handy at all times.

    We had some trouble with yellow jackets last summer and the summer before that, but I haven't seen too many yet this year. We do have lots of those little wasps or whatever they are that like to live in holes in the dirt under the shade trees though.