Water in dead hive

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by letitbee, Mar 5, 2012.

  1. letitbee

    letitbee New Member

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    As I posted the other day, my colony has died. I went in the hive today to clean up burr comb and such . I had dead beetles in the empty brood comb and as I was shaking the frames out I noticed water coming from the comb. My hives are new and don't leak water. Could it be frozen water vapor from when the bees were still alive? I took out the reducer and propped the cover open to allow air flow, hoping it will dry up. Also, I found some small pockets of dead, uncapped brood that I could not shake out. Should I cut out these sections of comb or will the new bees clean everything up themselves? There was not a lot of brood or water either but I am getting my new packages in about 30 days and I don't want to introduce my new colonies into a potentially harmful environment.
     
  2. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    The bees will clean everything up.
    not sure where all of the water would have come from, when did the bees finally give it up, after things started to bloom a little?
    It could be nectar.
     

  3. letitbee

    letitbee New Member

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    We are still in winter in Illinois so it can't be nectar. The dead brood I found looked almost ready to be capped so I am guessing the queen died sometime in February. Its weird because the water isn't in every frame, only a couple. I am wondering if it could be from the decaying bodies of the brood.:???:
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a snip..
    decaying bodies

    tecumseh
    I have never seen this happen. I would guess one of two things... 1) and most likely...ice that formed on the top of the cluster and then melted quickly on the first warm day or 2) some crack in the external wood wares that allowed some hard driving and likely cold water to enter.

    since cells are sloped slightly upward, water running down will at least partially fill the cells located below the source of the water.

    another snip..
    I found some small pockets of dead, uncapped brood

    tecumseh:
    again this suggest that the cluster died quickly with the most likely cause being very cold water. essentially they died from exposure.

    in a hive such as this here: if I was fairly certain there is no disease involved I typically just shake the loose dead bees out and allow 'the girls' to attend to any smaller detail. they are quite talented at that.