Wax Moths, Part II

Discussion in 'Pests and Diseases' started by Hobie, Aug 28, 2011.

  1. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    Well, I am now paying for my neglect.

    Last spring I found a dead hive, still with plenty of honey, and also lots of moldy dead bees. I did not know how to store them with the dead bees stuck in them, so I stacked the boxes out in the yard in the hopes that my other hive would clean them eventually.

    Well, they did clean them of the honey, as did the ants and other bees and wasps. The dead bees are still there, though. And, unfortunately, wax moths also invaded, and what I found today was absolutely disgusting. Webs and larvae and yick.

    I am assuming the comb is a goner, and am thinking of taking the frames out and leaving them (well away from the hives) for a bird and skunk feast, then cleaning up the frames and starting over.
    I guess my question is... is this the right approach? What is the best way to clean up badly infested frames? Also, what should be done with the frames that have some damage, but only in a small area?
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    You have the right idea. Go for it. Pull out the webs and reuse the decent comb. Freezing for 48 hours works quite well to dispatch larva and eggs.
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    Hobie writes:
    Also, what should be done with the frames that have some damage, but only in a small area?

    tecumseh:
    minor damage to the comb face I generally reuse. most times I introduce these to a very populated hive and they clean these up quickly and toss the garbage out the front door promptly. typically there will be some holes in the comb which may make them not so desirable as honey frames but may be very useful as brood frames <that is the holes provide access across from one frame to the other... it ain't pretty but it is VERY functional and is likely more so in places with long cold winters.