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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just had my first ever experience with wax moths. I noticed that one of my hives was not very active and when I got into it, I noticed wax moths. They had totally destroyed the comb and there was hardly a bee in there. :( So I tore it down and took the comb out and burned it. This was the hive that I know swarmed earlier because I saw it swarm. I got into another hive that was next to it today, and it was stronger than I thought. I saw the queen and capped brood, but they did have a lot of bees & honey. HOWEVER, I got into the swarm that I caught from this hive and I saw the queen, but very few bees, little honey and NO brood. I don't know what to do about this hive, but I did NOT see any wax moths. What should I do with this tiny bunch of bees? I put some sugar on them with a top feeder.

This has been the worst bee year ever here in this part of the country. We had a long cold and wet spring and the nice weather with blooms was not very long until we got the hot dry weather. I just hope and pray for a good fall flow or I won't get any honey at all. I am just glad I didn't pull any honey earlier, it may take all of it to get the hives through the winter. Good thing I don't do this for the honey money! I just really enjoy watching the bees and for the pollenation they do for us here on the farm. The honey is just an added bonus for us.
 

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Re: Was moths

if you dont mind me asking why would you burn your equipment due to wax moths.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
We just burnt the comb - we took it out of the frames - the comb was destroyed by wax moths.
 

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some folks try to salvage any wax remaining and even a fairly porous comb can be reused (but generally not encouraged by folks like myself). burning is quite acceptable, generally I kick the frame out of their box and place them loosely on a fire ant mound and a bit later recycle any wax remaining.
 

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I have not had to deal with this yet, but I really like the fire ant mound suggestion. I hadn't thought about how well they would clean it out.
 

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I spray all my frames with XenTari upon installation no wax moth problems.

After extraction and the frames have been cleaned I sometimes give a second dose, tho I understand it isn't needed.

Murrell
 

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If you have a solar wax melter, you could place the infested combs inside, melt and reclaim the wax, destroy any wax moth larvae inside, collect the honey that could be used for feeding and clean the frames for re-use all in one fell swoop.
 

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First I give them to my chickens; then to the fire ants!

Murrell, I wasn't aware you could spray frames prior to the bees drawing out the comb! I thought you had to spray Xentari on drawn comb for it to work. Are you saying that you spray foundation or just the frames? I've been switching to foundationless in the past couple of years. So I can just spray the frames?
 

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The moth larva has to ingest wax with BT on it for it to kill them. I don't think spraying foundation-less frames would do much good. If the larva reach the foundation Murrell has sprayed and ingest it, yes, it should work. Also keep in mind, it's brood comb with bee larva casing's they like the best, not honey only supers.
 

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rast;
Thanks for clarifing.
Correct you are, I should have been more specfic in my statement !

I understand it is the larva casing's and pollen residue they are after.

Murrell
 

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Murrell is absolutely correct here. if you look closely at a very wax moth eaten hive you will notice little small flecks of black wax moth larvae poop. there will be a great deal of this at the bottom board area. this is the wax remaining after the wax moth has consumed everything else... but again like Murrell says primarily the bee's casting and pollen residue in the comb. you can still render the wax from this mess if you wished.
 

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I've got a question, how does the impression of the cocoon get into the wooden parts of the hive if they only eat the wax and castings.I've had frames weakened so bad by wax moth, that i had to throw them in the fire. :confused: Jack
 

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My understanding is they "excavate" these depressions while in the mature larva stage with their mouth parts. (Clemson U. study)
 
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