Weather for new package

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by ablanton, Mar 31, 2012.

  1. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

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    The weather is horrible today -- slow rain. Should I go ahead and install my new package today if it stops, or wait until tomorrow? Not sure how ornery they might be...
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    It is forecast to clear around 1 or 2 PM. If the sun pops out, I would go ahead with it. Get your hives set up now and have everything ready. It shouldn't take more than 5 minutes to open the bees, remove the cork, hang the queen cage and dump or place the bees in. If you only shake out 90% of the bees, just prop the cage on the front of the hive and cover with plastic or something to keep the rain off. They will migrate to the hive.


    PS. Welcome. Glad to see you posting.
     

  3. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    This is one case whare I wouldnt go by the rule never take a cover off a hive you dont want the roof taken off your house. In light rain suit up and go ahead and install. Your much better off geting them in the hive and let them get started. Dont forget to feed feed and feed.
     
  4. Bsweet

    Bsweet Member

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    You will find that when your on a tight timeline that conditions are seldom perfect. You have to take advantage of any good window of oppertunity that pops up and not waite for all things to be perfect.
     
  5. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

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    I'm on a tight budget, so I've got no suit. I took a chance, anyway. The girls are in their new home and not one sting!

    bees.jpg
     
  6. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    like the hive stand every thing looks good. Can I ask what you used to weatherize the exposed woodwork. Good Job:thumbsup:
     
  7. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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  8. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

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    I put 3 coats of spar varnish on it about a month ago.
     
  9. jim314

    jim314 New Member

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    It looks good :)
     
  10. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    good job, glad to hear you got them set up!!
     
  11. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

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    For the amusement of the forum... My first go at this as a greenhorn knowing next to nothing.

    http://youtu.be/9_SdTQmdZUQ

    It probably wasn't very smart for us to go in unprotected but what we lacked in intelligence, we made up for with enthusiasm & excitement. Also had the horrible realization about an hour afterward that I had failed to remove the cork from the queen candy. Went back into the hive a little later in the afternoon to correct the mistake. Again, no stings or major issues. The girls were chowing down on pollen patties and syrup. Seemed to be taking to their new home quite well.
     
  12. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Save that clip and look it over in another 5 years. You too will be amazed that no one got stung. But never lose your enthusiasm, it's worth millions. :clapping:
     
  13. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    as many old hands know quite well 'usually' a swarm is the easiest thing to manage and the possibilities of some stinging incident is minimal. a package of bees is essentially a swarm in a wood and screen box. the 'usually' here is modified anytime you approach hungry bees (no matter what the form).... they are in are quite likely to be angry bees.
     
  14. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    lol yes that's why the very first thing you do to a package is spray them well, with sugar syrup. Likewise cloudy. rainy days will worsen a colonies mood considerably. Welcome to the forum
    Barry
     
  15. Zulu

    Zulu Member

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    Great, glad it has all worked out and also glad you managed to do it on your own, it is a great feeling to do it the first time ( and again later too)

    ....but do yourself a favor..... Take off the extra supers until the bees have drawn out the comb in 8 of the 10 frames in the deep , then add them one at a time , as 8 frames are drawn out full, then add the new one.....

    And I know Iddee will tell you to take off the excluder and put it in your shed for at least two years......
     
  16. kebee

    kebee Active Member

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    If it is raining when I get mine I will use the pool umberlla and put it over the hive until I get all of them in to keep the rain out, unless of course the wind is blowing to bad.

    kebee
     
  17. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Good job, except for the cork of course, but at least you remembered it!!

    I still say you did a fine job for the first time and not even any veil or gloves :thumbsup:
     
  18. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

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    They aren't really supers and it isn't an excluder. It is my inner cover with a pickle jar feeder on top of it. The "empty" super boxes are covering the feeder jar.