Well took the plunge today.

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by ASTMedic, Apr 28, 2013.

  1. ASTMedic

    ASTMedic New Member

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    Hello all,

    Picked up my Nuc today. Got the girls home and let them hang out next to the new hive for a while with the Nuc entrance open so they could come out and cool down since it was a bit warm today. About 7pm they looked mellow enough to transfer to the hive body so I fired up the smoker. Figured I'd man up and go at it sans gloves, no cussing ensued so that worked out ok. The frames were stuck together so I was able to take them out as a whole unit and stuck them in the hive like that. Filled the rest with new frames and done in about 15 min. All went smooth as butter.

    I finally figured out I was missing the bottom board. Not sure if it never got ordered or didn't get packed since the hive was a gift from my father. So I had to make due with the screened bottom and stand then set all that on some plywood. I'll have to order a real bottom board the week. I have an order in with Mann Lake for a frame feeder so I'll have to add that on.

    Cooling off time

    [​IMG]

    We're on 10 acres. Hive faces south east and will catch full sun till about noon. Behind is a LARGE (50'x10') blackberry mass for wind break (good) but critters live there (bad). I placed a brick on the top to keep them out, I hope. My big garden is about 100' away so they will have a lot to choose from between that and the blackberries, not including all the wild flowers.

    Home sweet home

    [​IMG]

    Any tips???

    Any reason I should have pulled the frames apart?

    Do I need to be feeding sugar water to help them stay strong early on? Bloom is just about to be full on in the next week or two.
     
  2. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    Good for you! :) I hope it all works out for you.
     

  3. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I think you've done pretty well. The only reason to have pulled the frames apart would have been to see what you got I suppose, but if the seller has a good rep you should be fine.
    The only mistake I see is that there is an empty space next to your hive on that stand where another hive could be sitting. :wink: :thumbsup:

    And congratulations on your first post! :hi:
    Welcome to our friendly forum. :thumbsup:
     
  4. ASTMedic

    ASTMedic New Member

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    Ya I'm wishing I had bought a second now. I'm going to add another next year for sure.
     
  5. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Add my applause to those of Perry. You overcame your unexpected "hitch" with true beekeeper ingenuity. You are definitely on your way. If there is a honey flow in the nieghborhood, I wouldn't feed. That way, when the time comes for you to harvest your first honey, you'll know that it's honey you're getting and not bee-processed sugar syrup.
    :hi:
    Welcome to the forum ASTMedic. :grin:
     
  6. ASTMedic

    ASTMedic New Member

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    Sounds good. What are the odds of needing to add a super to the hive this year? All I have is a second deep body so I'd have to buy a super and excluder.

    My brother got a hive last year and had a hard time getting them to fill in all the frames of his second hive body. Sounds like they chimney in the second box. His hive is on the west side of his house though so it doesn't get the sun like this one will.
     
  7. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    That's a question to ask someone local, who knows the local conditions---What flowers? When? How long? Then again, so much depends on how the weather shapes up during the season. That's one of the reasons why beekeepers pray. :razz:
     
  8. ASTMedic

    ASTMedic New Member

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    Good point.

    There's a HUGE blackberry mass just behind this hive that is about a week or so from blooming so that should help out a lot.
     
  9. litefoot

    litefoot New Member

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    I'd definitely give them some syrup. Edit: But if things are blooming, they'll ignore it. The other reason to pull the frames apart would have been to find the queen or evidence of her recent activity. I was not a able to separate frames on my latest nuc because it was cold that day. Edit: Oh and a big hearty welcome. Great family here!
     
  10. ASTMedic

    ASTMedic New Member

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    I trust the source. My brother has had no problem in the past dealings with him. I'm going to give them a week to settle in and I'll open them up and pull the frames apart to get a good look.

    As for feeding what advice do you have? What syrup ratio should I use? Anything else I should add to help expand the colony? I'm going to use a Mann Lake frame feeder.
     
  11. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Good job and have fun!
     
  12. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    1 to 1 sugar syrup in the spring, 2 parts sugar to 1 part water in the fall.
    An extra super kicking around is never a bad thing.
     
  13. ASTMedic

    ASTMedic New Member

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    Ya I've got the one hive body in use now and another waiting in the wings with frames. I'm hoping to get the second on there soon and would really be happy if they needed a super on that but I think that's a bit much to ask now.

    One question my brother and I have been bouncing back and fourth is about full sun on the hive. How long should the hive get full sun in a 90+ degree region? Grandpa has multiple hives in full sun all day in Arkansas heat/humidity and has bang up honey flows. Here in Cali my brother is having a hard time filling out 2 hive bodies on the shady side of his house. Ideas???
     
  14. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    Rule #1: There's nothing better than free bees (unless it's free woodenware or an extractor).

    Rule #2: You never have enough wooden ware (boxes).
     
  15. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    I believe that full sun (with adequate ventilation) is becoming necessary for SHB. They don't like light. I've only ever seen one or two in my hives, and they're in full sun all day. But, as always, YMMV. Good luck! :)
     
  16. Beeracuda

    Beeracuda New Member

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    I found this to be true this weekend. And I also figured out that free bees weren't exactly free. I only have enough woodenware for the two hives I was planning on having and none for the swarm I caught. My package is set to ship this week, so I have to buy woodenware and hope it gets here on time.
     
  17. ASTMedic

    ASTMedic New Member

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    One of the Mann Lake warehouses is just 45min from my house so I can grab supplies easy. Lucky me
     
  18. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    question#1-"What are the odds of needing to add a super to the hive this year? All I have is a second deep body so I'd have to buy a super and excluder.
    My brother got a hive last year and had a hard time getting them to fill in all the frames of his second hive body. Sounds like they chimney in the second box. His hive is on the west side of his house though so it doesn't get the sun like this one will. "

    ef's answer: "That's a question to ask someone local, who knows the local conditions---What flowers? When? How long? Then again, so much depends on how the weather shapes up during the season. That's one of the reasons why beekeepers pray."

    question #2-"As for feeding what advice do you have? What syrup ratio should I use? Anything else I should add to help expand the colony? I'm going to use a Mann Lake frame feeder.
    One question my brother and I have been bouncing back and fourth is about full sun on the hive. How long should the hive get full sun in a 90+ degree region? Grandpa has multiple hives in full sun all day in Arkansas heat/humidity and has bang up honey flows. Here in Cali my brother is having a hard time filling out 2 hive bodies on the shady side of his house. Ideas???"

    question #3-"I've got the one hive body in use now and another waiting in the wings with frames. I'm hoping to get the second on there soon and would really be happy if they needed a super on that but I think that's a bit much to ask now."

    astmedic, first, what do you plan to overwinter your bees in? 2 deeps? 1 deep and a medium super? i am guessing that your frames are not drawn?

    to answer question #1 and #3, anytime you have a new hive, feed, until they stop taking it. anytime there are frames to be drawn, feed syrup 1:1, until they are drawn, whether it be a deep or a super. if the super is to be used for harvesting honey, pull the feed off as soon as the frames are near drawn or drawn, this will prevent any sugar syrup being harvested. bees will chimney up in boxes, so when you see them doing this, just rearrange the frames, move filled frames to the outside, and empty ones in the center. sun, ideally you want the sun shining on the hives first thing in the morning to get them out working. also, what ef said about your local conditions.

    #2- the bees need nectar, pollen and water, provide a water source for them if need be. feeding; 1:1 sugar syrup. also different regions have many variables when it comes to honey production, weather, nectar and pollen sources all affect this, again what ef said. as far as sun? what i said above, full sun in the am, get the girls out working, some afternoon shade if you can. if your brother has hives in full shade, i would move them. bees are very good at regulating hive temps, as long as we provide good ventilation, some shade during the heat of the day if you can, and a wind break in winter months.
     
  19. ASTMedic

    ASTMedic New Member

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    Got good afternoon shade on my hives starting at about 1:30. Water source is a large pond about 50yrds away. As for wintering I was going to do the two deep bodies (if they fill them) and then add a med or two as needed for honey flow when they get that big. Winter here gets into mid 20's at night on occasion and 40's during the day.
     
  20. me2pl

    me2pl New Member

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    one possible issue i see is ants? we've lost two hives of four and both have had ant infestations, of course, we do live on a giant anthill. ants may not be an issue where you are, and it's also possible that ants were a symptom of big hive issues and not the cause (given that both our dead hives were in the same box it looks increasingly possible that the box has foulbrood. we won't take that chance again).